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Staring Down Death

Posted By: Randy GageJune 1, 2011

He was holding the gun at my abdomen, when he finally pulled the trigger.  The shot was loud enough to stun me, hurt my ears, and echo off the building across the street.  I clutched at my gut while the impact knocked me backwards to the pavement.

When I got my bearings, I noticed an expanding pool of blood around me.  I figured that the noise would have woken up everybody, lights would come on, and someone would come to help me...

Nothing happened.

I started to realize that if I wanted to live, I needed to get up, go to my apartment and call for help.  I ripped my shirt off, tied it around my stomach as best as I could, got up, crossed the  street, climbed a flight of stairs, entered my house, and  collapsed into a chair by the phone.  I called for an ambulance and waited as my blood continued draining onto my carpet.

As we rode to the hospital I went into shock, and my blood pressure was dropping dangerously.  They finally slipped a pressurized suit on my body and blew it up with air to keep my heart pumping.

When we got to the hospital, the staff kept insisting I give them the number of my next of kin (my mother), so they could call her.  I kept refusing, and told them they could call my business partner, but I didn’t want them waking up my mother and worrying her.  I told them that my partner would call her in the morning.  They tried to explain to me that I might not make it to the morning.

I wasn’t buying it…

I kept insisting they not frighten my mother.  The nurses gave up and brought in the surgeon and several other doctors.  They explained that I was in shock, had a faltering heartbeat, and had lost a great deal of blood.  They didn’t know what vital organs had been hit, or where the bullet was located.  They insisted they should contact my mother.

I assured them that the operation would go perfectly fine, and my mother could be notified in the morning, when I was in the recovery room.  Since they desperately needed to start the operation, and since I wouldn’t budge on my stance no matter how hard they argued, they finally relented.

I just knew that I was going to survive.  How did I know?  No idea, I just knew that I knew.

It wasn’t a case of fearing death, or fighting death. Death simply wasn’t part of the equation for me at that point.  Your mind cannot process two conflicting thoughts at the same time, and all I was thinking about at that moment was living.  So continuing our discussion from the last post, here are a couple questions for you:

Have you ever just known something, even when you didn’t know how you knew it?  And what’s the lesson in all this for you?

-RG

 

34 comments on “Staring Down Death”

  1. Yes and for certain things I still won't move on them but this story gives me perspective and i will move on the Things that I know without any proof except for just knowing on the inside! Powerful Randy

  2. I know that when I say to myself that no matter what i am going to do something , it always ends up happening . When I look at the big picture and see the result it makes me want it even more . Randy we are so very thankful you kept that mindset and are here on the earth today. You inspire me everyday to push it to the next level.

  3. And I've looked back at situations I have been in and events I have gone through where I easily could have expired yet didn't. Sometimes I am dumbstruck that I've walked away from what I have just been through. So I figure there is something I still have to achieve or learn before I too am done here....

  4. When I was born extremely premature, the doctors all expected me to die. I wasn't breathing right, had heart problems, etc. My parents were counseled to prepare for the worst. But lo and behold, I survived.

    So, when I was little my mother gave me my "story." She told me that all the experts said I was going to die but that God had a wonderful plan for me. To my little brain, I took this to mean "I am invincible!" I then survived several car crashes and bike accidents without a scratch. Of course, I was invincible. It wasn't until high school that I modified my belief. Okay, I may still be invincible but I could be hurt!"

    Many years later as an adult I was stricken with a rare condition that could have resulted in permanent paralysis or disability. But that wasn't "my story." I just knew I was going to emerge unscathed. And to the shock of my neurologist and his quite skeptical head nurse...I did.

    Yes, I knew it.

  5. Wow - what a story Randy - I'm glad you knew and did not buy into you might not make it through the night. I think it's a decision you make in most incidenses. I experienced that when I got hit by a motorbike and flew through the air and landed on the ground. Actually I had my back to the motorbike, but just before he hit me, I just knew it was going to happen. My exact thought was "now it happens" I was not afraid at all, just decided it would not be pleasent to stay in my body, so I went above, high above. And that's when everything "went black" from my body point of view. And watching from above, I decided "now I have to get back in my body, because it's safe now, and I did. So I saw again things from my eyes, sitting in the middle of the road. Funny thing is that the first thing I thought about, was that I had to pick up my things, and get off the road, and I did. When the ambulance arrived, I was standing on the sidewalk, and the first aid people scolded me for standing up. I wondered why, why should I not stand up when I could. I got to the hospital, and it turned out that the lowest part of my spine was broken and I developed 2 very big black eyes from the hit. Actually I was very lucky, that I did not end in a wheelchair, and I am convinced that it is because that possibility was not part of my equation. I learned from this later, that what you resist you get, so the possibility that something bad is going to happen, have to get "deleted" from you mind and as you mentioned a lot of times that vacuum will fill uo with good.

    Lene

  6. In answer to your question, yes. I've had times in my life when I absolutely knew what the outcome was going to be, even though looking back there were no guarantees. I'm referring to good experiences and challenges. I had a similar health issue where doctors told me I absolutely needed an operation or faced the possibility of death. I let them know there was no way I would let them operate...not to be stubborn, but because I knew I would pull out of the issue I was having. I have that same feeling about certain things now. Not to over-analyze this, but your story and question makes me think about where this certainty comes from. Is it maybe some type of intuition or just an obsession with how we feel the end result should be?

    1. Good question RJ! Are we predicting (intuition) .... or are we creating ("how it should be")? I'm going to weigh in on the side of creating.

      I believe what we call "Intuition" is actually an aspect of the creative manifestation process. Dat's my opinion, and I'm stickin' with 'er.

  7. I'm not always sure if it is mind over matter for me, or intuition when these feeling surface.

  8. Goodness man!

    That's a scary story with such empathy. Well, glad you were stubborn to remain here on the planet to share your gifts with us all.

    As far as your question, about just knowing something and the lesson learned is:

    "Dont get shot! But, if you happen to get shot, and fight or flight sets in, fight like a mofo? even in normal daily ventures as well"

    set your expectations, make your mind up and you'll get what you expect.

    ~Eric Louviere

    1. OMG, a special guest appearance on my blog by my brother!

      It's funny looking back at it now. I didn't want to worry mom, but of course that may not have been the most rational thing to do, and she was upset I didn't have them call immediately.

      -RG

      1. When we are dealing with other folks - especially our most-loved ones - there's just no way of knowing what the "right" things to do or say might be.... can there be any for-sure-absolutely right action? We all fumble along as best we can, forgiving ourselves as needed.

      2. I would have done the same thing you did Randy. Why put someone through a tramatic moment when you knew, for sure, you were going to be O.K. I'm sure you would have called if you knew you were not going to survive.

      3. I think your brother wanted to know a little sooner.

        It would be so fun to hear a story about you and Randy, Jay. Maybe sometime huh? What was "little" Randy like? Did he have hair? 🙂

      4. Randy, why didn't you tell your brother sooner? I don't think we here have to know, but maybe you should talk to your brother about it.

    2. How cool Jay!!!! So great to see you here!!!!

      It's funny - I'm about to run this course on Siblings without Rivalry - and it's amazing what comes out in thise course... Of people being told things, how long it took, and what it means...

      It sweetens my heart to see you here, and feel your care and love for Randy!

      Welcome...

      So much love xoxox

  9. What a dramatic story, Randy. Luckily, your drama is not a tragedy, but a comedy (in the Shakespearean sense - lots of dramatic tension, with plenty of excitement, misunderstandings, and so forth, but in the end, everything works out.)
    I don't have much drama in my life - it's there, but it is subtle - so I can't "see you and raise you one" on this story.

    Have I ever had a knowing? Of course.
    Have I trusted my knowings? Welll......
    and therein lies the key to this story, for me (What did you get, Class, from this story?) To trust my knowings.

    Doctors, unfortunately, often feel they are omniscient, and able to accurately predict the future. So another lesson from this Story might be, "No one, not even some one with years of medical training and experience, can Predict the Future. Therefore, remember that when someone predicts What Is Going to Happen - they are just guessing! Economic Forecasters, Enviro-doomsters, Cancer Doctors, even Parents, are subject to error when it comes to predicting the future.
    Thanks for another thought-provoking post, Randy.

  10. What was going on in your mind while dealing with the doctors in the hospital, is in every way similar to what I went through. One hour after I gave birth to my daughter, I experienced chest pains, which ultimately was diagnosed later as a heart event. Although the nurses thought I was having other post-delivery pains, I knew what was going on. Lesson #1 : Listen to my inner voice! Without going into too many details, whoever was around me at that point, including the medical staff were scared for my being. I WAS NOT. Dying was not an option that day. It was time to live and actually to lead new life (my daughter's). Lesson #2: smell the roses more often.

  11. Randy, your story reminded me of my own. Now, night calls scare me!
    I got this call one night from the hospital and they told me that my son was wounded in the stomach with a knife and I must urgently come to the hospital, he will have surgery!

    It is terrible to think ... My son is also a tough guy, and just now I understand how he felt pressure.

    The operation was a terrible six hours. Of course, I prayed and asked the Lord, but I knew exactly what my son did not die!
    Excuse me, Randy - My English is bad, but could not write. Memories came flooding ...

  12. I have had that experience, of knowing, but not knowing how I knew it. It's such a powerful experience it's difficult to translate into words. When you know something in your heart, no other outcome is possible and it doesn't matter what's happening around you. The belief is unshakable. My lesson is to be in that space more often!

  13. Weirdly enough, I had the same kind of "I just knew it" kind of feeling when making a decision to hire a life coach/business mentor a few weeks ago.

    Kudos to you for having the strength to pull yourself out of the hell you were experiencing and make it out alive... the word is a better place because of it! 🙂

    Jeremy Reeves

  14. The lesson for me is that we must trust in the Infinite Power that lives within us. All the answers, all the wisdom are just within us.
    I'm glad you're alive 🙂

    Ximena.

  15. Thanks Randy for remembering this.

    "I know it" - is the most powerful feeling I know 🙂
    You know it, when something happens, almost every time appears somebody who says: "I knew that" What he knew? Why he knew that it will happen exactly this way?

    I absolutely agree with Carmen, but my question is:

    How can I reach this mode 'I know that,..' for everything I choose.

    Do you anybody know the easy-method how can I purposely/consciously create this 'I know - persuasion' inside of me?

  16. Yes, there were times when I just knew what was going to happen!

    I had acute appendicitis so bad I had to be carried to the ambulance and brought to the hospital. Every bump along the way, even the little gaps along the hospital were agony!

    Laid there for 5 hours, waiting for the surgeon whom they finally contacted - he was at a dinner function.

    Meanwhile, they couldn't give me any painkillers as that would have screwed up any attempt at diagnosis.

    So for 5 hours, I endured the pain which doubled me up so bad there was no way I could walk, and the seconds ticked by and I was alone in my pain. I was gasping at every breath, just to handle the pain.

    There was a moment of realisation when I decided to call for the ambulance that this was not an ordinary tummy ache! But at the same time, as the hours wore on, there was no doubt in my mind that I was going to have to just handle it, with no assurance of any respite

    I remember the surgeon, briskly walking into the room, still in his dinner jacket. He took a brief look at me and said, "Looks like we've got to go in." And I said, OK, in a way that I think surprised the hospital at my calmness.

    Actually, I had been warded for observation a couple of weeks before and discharged. Apparently, I already had appendicitis and the surgeon told me I had a high threshhold of pain which hid my true condition. I guess I took that as a compliment!

    I have a laprotomy scar down my middle as a reminder of that drama.

    My memory of it is not unpleasant or frightening. I think it kind of strengthened me from the experience. There is a feeling of calm that I have been able, whenever I want to, to re-visit by a kind of instant meditation.

    After all, what's the worst that could happen? We die.

    And we're going to die someday anyway...

    kh

  17. Death is never part of my plans - and I've told him so a couple of times when we got briefly acquainted. 🙂 

    I found that it's not death that I fear, but to have yet made full use of my life here before I go would be the biggest tragedy. 

    So yes, I have 'known' many times that I'll survive, I'll thrive; but my encounters with death has also helped me realized that my time here in this form is not eternal - and one day, i would have to leave. 

    So, make full use of my life, waste no time on that which brings no joy, beauty or love, and strive every moment to make an enduring difference to the people around you - because you do make a difference. 

    I learned how much i was loved when i met near death encounters, i was humbled & grateful. And I learned how much I truly love this world and everything about it. And then when that feeling of love for all existence wells up in my heart - that's when I really know, that I am here  for a reason. So I'm gonna make it count. 

    I love you rocksta - thanks for staying alive, I needed to know you. 🙂 xoxo

  18. Oprah says God always speaks first in a quiet whisper. I've learned to listen to that whisper. She goes on to say if you don't get heed the whisper He hits you with a ton of bricks! I've seen that first hand, the whisper is better. I had a whisper with my son. He had just been born and we were still in the hospital. I asked the Dr to repeat his hearing test. She looked at me like I had three heads, and said he passed his test, he was fine. We would continue this dance for 18 months, every time I took him in for a checkup. I finally said enough, I want a second opinion. He had an appointment the next day with the #1 ENT in Dallas (after the appt was scheduled the girl said,"I don't know how you got in for tomorrow, he's booked 6-8 weeks out!). The doctor scheduled him for surgery the following day... my baby could NOT hear! Don't ever second guess the whisper, the voice, that tells you to do something, or that tells you to be calm and not to fear.
    My son is now 3.5, has 100% of his hearing, and only a slight speech delay that is getting better each day. 🙂 Be proactive in your life and listen!

  19. Randy - I'm selfishly glad you're alive today...

    "Have you ever just known something?" That I would know you! Many years ago - talking with you on a call with John Milton Fogg. You mad eme laugh, shared your story... and hooked me for life.

    What I didn't know is how deeply you'd love me too... and be here/there/everywhere for me...

    That when I get lost and lose the will to get through something... You remind me of who I am. To get over stuff and celebrate life. Xxxxoxx

  20. It reminds me when my mother was pregnant with me the doctor told my father that my mother and I may not live. My mother gave birth to me and she passed away from this physical world 5 minutes later. My father and my family told me that her determination on her face was to give birth to me before she passed on.

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  • 34 comments on “Staring Down Death”

    1. Yes and for certain things I still won't move on them but this story gives me perspective and i will move on the Things that I know without any proof except for just knowing on the inside! Powerful Randy

    2. I know that when I say to myself that no matter what i am going to do something , it always ends up happening . When I look at the big picture and see the result it makes me want it even more . Randy we are so very thankful you kept that mindset and are here on the earth today. You inspire me everyday to push it to the next level.

    3. And I've looked back at situations I have been in and events I have gone through where I easily could have expired yet didn't. Sometimes I am dumbstruck that I've walked away from what I have just been through. So I figure there is something I still have to achieve or learn before I too am done here....

    4. When I was born extremely premature, the doctors all expected me to die. I wasn't breathing right, had heart problems, etc. My parents were counseled to prepare for the worst. But lo and behold, I survived.

      So, when I was little my mother gave me my "story." She told me that all the experts said I was going to die but that God had a wonderful plan for me. To my little brain, I took this to mean "I am invincible!" I then survived several car crashes and bike accidents without a scratch. Of course, I was invincible. It wasn't until high school that I modified my belief. Okay, I may still be invincible but I could be hurt!"

      Many years later as an adult I was stricken with a rare condition that could have resulted in permanent paralysis or disability. But that wasn't "my story." I just knew I was going to emerge unscathed. And to the shock of my neurologist and his quite skeptical head nurse...I did.

      Yes, I knew it.

    5. Wow - what a story Randy - I'm glad you knew and did not buy into you might not make it through the night. I think it's a decision you make in most incidenses. I experienced that when I got hit by a motorbike and flew through the air and landed on the ground. Actually I had my back to the motorbike, but just before he hit me, I just knew it was going to happen. My exact thought was "now it happens" I was not afraid at all, just decided it would not be pleasent to stay in my body, so I went above, high above. And that's when everything "went black" from my body point of view. And watching from above, I decided "now I have to get back in my body, because it's safe now, and I did. So I saw again things from my eyes, sitting in the middle of the road. Funny thing is that the first thing I thought about, was that I had to pick up my things, and get off the road, and I did. When the ambulance arrived, I was standing on the sidewalk, and the first aid people scolded me for standing up. I wondered why, why should I not stand up when I could. I got to the hospital, and it turned out that the lowest part of my spine was broken and I developed 2 very big black eyes from the hit. Actually I was very lucky, that I did not end in a wheelchair, and I am convinced that it is because that possibility was not part of my equation. I learned from this later, that what you resist you get, so the possibility that something bad is going to happen, have to get "deleted" from you mind and as you mentioned a lot of times that vacuum will fill uo with good.

      Lene

    6. In answer to your question, yes. I've had times in my life when I absolutely knew what the outcome was going to be, even though looking back there were no guarantees. I'm referring to good experiences and challenges. I had a similar health issue where doctors told me I absolutely needed an operation or faced the possibility of death. I let them know there was no way I would let them operate...not to be stubborn, but because I knew I would pull out of the issue I was having. I have that same feeling about certain things now. Not to over-analyze this, but your story and question makes me think about where this certainty comes from. Is it maybe some type of intuition or just an obsession with how we feel the end result should be?

      1. Good question RJ! Are we predicting (intuition) .... or are we creating ("how it should be")? I'm going to weigh in on the side of creating.

        I believe what we call "Intuition" is actually an aspect of the creative manifestation process. Dat's my opinion, and I'm stickin' with 'er.

    7. I'm not always sure if it is mind over matter for me, or intuition when these feeling surface.

    8. Goodness man!

      That's a scary story with such empathy. Well, glad you were stubborn to remain here on the planet to share your gifts with us all.

      As far as your question, about just knowing something and the lesson learned is:

      "Dont get shot! But, if you happen to get shot, and fight or flight sets in, fight like a mofo? even in normal daily ventures as well"

      set your expectations, make your mind up and you'll get what you expect.

      ~Eric Louviere

      1. OMG, a special guest appearance on my blog by my brother!

        It's funny looking back at it now. I didn't want to worry mom, but of course that may not have been the most rational thing to do, and she was upset I didn't have them call immediately.

        -RG

        1. When we are dealing with other folks - especially our most-loved ones - there's just no way of knowing what the "right" things to do or say might be.... can there be any for-sure-absolutely right action? We all fumble along as best we can, forgiving ourselves as needed.

        2. I would have done the same thing you did Randy. Why put someone through a tramatic moment when you knew, for sure, you were going to be O.K. I'm sure you would have called if you knew you were not going to survive.

        3. I think your brother wanted to know a little sooner.

          It would be so fun to hear a story about you and Randy, Jay. Maybe sometime huh? What was "little" Randy like? Did he have hair? 🙂

        4. Randy, why didn't you tell your brother sooner? I don't think we here have to know, but maybe you should talk to your brother about it.

      2. How cool Jay!!!! So great to see you here!!!!

        It's funny - I'm about to run this course on Siblings without Rivalry - and it's amazing what comes out in thise course... Of people being told things, how long it took, and what it means...

        It sweetens my heart to see you here, and feel your care and love for Randy!

        Welcome...

        So much love xoxox

    9. What a dramatic story, Randy. Luckily, your drama is not a tragedy, but a comedy (in the Shakespearean sense - lots of dramatic tension, with plenty of excitement, misunderstandings, and so forth, but in the end, everything works out.)
      I don't have much drama in my life - it's there, but it is subtle - so I can't "see you and raise you one" on this story.

      Have I ever had a knowing? Of course.
      Have I trusted my knowings? Welll......
      and therein lies the key to this story, for me (What did you get, Class, from this story?) To trust my knowings.

      Doctors, unfortunately, often feel they are omniscient, and able to accurately predict the future. So another lesson from this Story might be, "No one, not even some one with years of medical training and experience, can Predict the Future. Therefore, remember that when someone predicts What Is Going to Happen - they are just guessing! Economic Forecasters, Enviro-doomsters, Cancer Doctors, even Parents, are subject to error when it comes to predicting the future.
      Thanks for another thought-provoking post, Randy.

    10. What was going on in your mind while dealing with the doctors in the hospital, is in every way similar to what I went through. One hour after I gave birth to my daughter, I experienced chest pains, which ultimately was diagnosed later as a heart event. Although the nurses thought I was having other post-delivery pains, I knew what was going on. Lesson #1 : Listen to my inner voice! Without going into too many details, whoever was around me at that point, including the medical staff were scared for my being. I WAS NOT. Dying was not an option that day. It was time to live and actually to lead new life (my daughter's). Lesson #2: smell the roses more often.

    11. Randy, your story reminded me of my own. Now, night calls scare me!
      I got this call one night from the hospital and they told me that my son was wounded in the stomach with a knife and I must urgently come to the hospital, he will have surgery!

      It is terrible to think ... My son is also a tough guy, and just now I understand how he felt pressure.

      The operation was a terrible six hours. Of course, I prayed and asked the Lord, but I knew exactly what my son did not die!
      Excuse me, Randy - My English is bad, but could not write. Memories came flooding ...

    12. I have had that experience, of knowing, but not knowing how I knew it. It's such a powerful experience it's difficult to translate into words. When you know something in your heart, no other outcome is possible and it doesn't matter what's happening around you. The belief is unshakable. My lesson is to be in that space more often!

    13. Weirdly enough, I had the same kind of "I just knew it" kind of feeling when making a decision to hire a life coach/business mentor a few weeks ago.

      Kudos to you for having the strength to pull yourself out of the hell you were experiencing and make it out alive... the word is a better place because of it! 🙂

      Jeremy Reeves

    14. The lesson for me is that we must trust in the Infinite Power that lives within us. All the answers, all the wisdom are just within us.
      I'm glad you're alive 🙂

      Ximena.

    15. Thanks Randy for remembering this.

      "I know it" - is the most powerful feeling I know 🙂
      You know it, when something happens, almost every time appears somebody who says: "I knew that" What he knew? Why he knew that it will happen exactly this way?

      I absolutely agree with Carmen, but my question is:

      How can I reach this mode 'I know that,..' for everything I choose.

      Do you anybody know the easy-method how can I purposely/consciously create this 'I know - persuasion' inside of me?

    16. Yes, there were times when I just knew what was going to happen!

      I had acute appendicitis so bad I had to be carried to the ambulance and brought to the hospital. Every bump along the way, even the little gaps along the hospital were agony!

      Laid there for 5 hours, waiting for the surgeon whom they finally contacted - he was at a dinner function.

      Meanwhile, they couldn't give me any painkillers as that would have screwed up any attempt at diagnosis.

      So for 5 hours, I endured the pain which doubled me up so bad there was no way I could walk, and the seconds ticked by and I was alone in my pain. I was gasping at every breath, just to handle the pain.

      There was a moment of realisation when I decided to call for the ambulance that this was not an ordinary tummy ache! But at the same time, as the hours wore on, there was no doubt in my mind that I was going to have to just handle it, with no assurance of any respite

      I remember the surgeon, briskly walking into the room, still in his dinner jacket. He took a brief look at me and said, "Looks like we've got to go in." And I said, OK, in a way that I think surprised the hospital at my calmness.

      Actually, I had been warded for observation a couple of weeks before and discharged. Apparently, I already had appendicitis and the surgeon told me I had a high threshhold of pain which hid my true condition. I guess I took that as a compliment!

      I have a laprotomy scar down my middle as a reminder of that drama.

      My memory of it is not unpleasant or frightening. I think it kind of strengthened me from the experience. There is a feeling of calm that I have been able, whenever I want to, to re-visit by a kind of instant meditation.

      After all, what's the worst that could happen? We die.

      And we're going to die someday anyway...

      kh

    17. Death is never part of my plans - and I've told him so a couple of times when we got briefly acquainted. 🙂 

      I found that it's not death that I fear, but to have yet made full use of my life here before I go would be the biggest tragedy. 

      So yes, I have 'known' many times that I'll survive, I'll thrive; but my encounters with death has also helped me realized that my time here in this form is not eternal - and one day, i would have to leave. 

      So, make full use of my life, waste no time on that which brings no joy, beauty or love, and strive every moment to make an enduring difference to the people around you - because you do make a difference. 

      I learned how much i was loved when i met near death encounters, i was humbled & grateful. And I learned how much I truly love this world and everything about it. And then when that feeling of love for all existence wells up in my heart - that's when I really know, that I am here  for a reason. So I'm gonna make it count. 

      I love you rocksta - thanks for staying alive, I needed to know you. 🙂 xoxo

    18. Oprah says God always speaks first in a quiet whisper. I've learned to listen to that whisper. She goes on to say if you don't get heed the whisper He hits you with a ton of bricks! I've seen that first hand, the whisper is better. I had a whisper with my son. He had just been born and we were still in the hospital. I asked the Dr to repeat his hearing test. She looked at me like I had three heads, and said he passed his test, he was fine. We would continue this dance for 18 months, every time I took him in for a checkup. I finally said enough, I want a second opinion. He had an appointment the next day with the #1 ENT in Dallas (after the appt was scheduled the girl said,"I don't know how you got in for tomorrow, he's booked 6-8 weeks out!). The doctor scheduled him for surgery the following day... my baby could NOT hear! Don't ever second guess the whisper, the voice, that tells you to do something, or that tells you to be calm and not to fear.
      My son is now 3.5, has 100% of his hearing, and only a slight speech delay that is getting better each day. 🙂 Be proactive in your life and listen!

    19. Randy - I'm selfishly glad you're alive today...

      "Have you ever just known something?" That I would know you! Many years ago - talking with you on a call with John Milton Fogg. You mad eme laugh, shared your story... and hooked me for life.

      What I didn't know is how deeply you'd love me too... and be here/there/everywhere for me...

      That when I get lost and lose the will to get through something... You remind me of who I am. To get over stuff and celebrate life. Xxxxoxx

    20. It reminds me when my mother was pregnant with me the doctor told my father that my mother and I may not live. My mother gave birth to me and she passed away from this physical world 5 minutes later. My father and my family told me that her determination on her face was to give birth to me before she passed on.

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