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How You Win

Posted By: Randy GageJanuary 28, 2015

There’s a reason for practice. During my sabbatical I wasn’t accepting new speeches, but of course honored the ones that had been already booked.  And I discovered that speaking is like anything else: If you don’t practice, your skills slip.

The last speech I did was a Risky Is the New Safe keynote at the C-Suite conference presented by Jeffrey Hayzlett.  Nice event, nice crowd, I got a nice response. But the next day, I told Jeffrey I couldn’t accept my check.

I was pretty sure the evaluations would come in good and no one seemed unhappy. But I was unhappy. Because I knew the speech wasn’t even close to the level I’m capable of delivering. Because I was out of practice.

We sometimes think practice is just for sports, but it’s for everything. And if you’re truly a professional at something, you get in your practice.  You never really win the match in the match. You win the match by the practice you do leading up to it.

So what do you need to practice today?

-RG

33 comments on “How You Win”

  1. Makes me think of the interview with the basketball player, I forget his name. I think he was disrespecting the team and its leadership by acting too good for and not needing to practice. Anyway in the interview he kept saying "PRACTICE!?" And "We talking about PRACTICE!?"
    Anyway, yea I dig it man. If we don't use it we lose it. Great post. Cool story. I can totally see you turning down that fat fee too. Good for you. I dig it.

  2. Presentations. I have done many, yet as you mentioned yourself, it has been over 6 months since my last one and I feel like amateurs again preparing for it. Therefore I see now, that although I may not have a presentation scheduled, consistently, I must consistently visit the techniques involved with the entire process, in order to keep up "my game". This message couldn't have came at a better time. Thanks Randy

  3. Refusing your check for the speech brings the principle of fair exchange of value to another level.  Very interesting way to think about it.  Thanks for the post!

  4. Great post, Randy!
    About as professional as it gets. It's interesting how important it to keep our skills sharp.
    I'm sure next time you are up on the platform your going to blow them away... Get back in that overnight seminar shape and you'll be good to go.
    As Always, Here's to Your LifetoSuccess,
    God Bless You,
    John Clark - http://www.lifetosuccess.com

  5. Stephen Covey lists' Sharpen Your Axe' as one of the seven principles of highly effective people. And who can forgot the 300 dialogue- 'More you sweat at the practise ground less you bleed in the battle'

  6. This is reminiscent of my early studies with Ram Dass, who always reminded of this very old Buddhist saying "Before enlightenment, carrying water and chopping wood. After enlightenment, carrying water and chopping wood". As for myself I must continue to learn and Let Go of resistance in all it's many forms as I work on the development of a breakthrough in storytelling that affects people of all types.. "The beat goes on.."

  7. You know, Randy, this post triggered a thought in me. Practice takes so much time and energy. Even if you're an expert in whatever field - be it in the sciences, the arts, sports or entertainment - you just have to practice to stay at the top of your game. So, the question is: Am I willing to spend this much time, effort and resources on practicing on THIS? Practice can be dull and routine, and it can be painful, which brings out another question: Do I love what I do ENOUGH, to spend this much time practicing?

  8. Great post. Spot on. When I was a TOPGUN fighter pilot instructor years ago, we used to say that "Everyone wants to win. Not everyone is willing to prepare to win." I have always tried to remember that in my post-Navy career. A great resource for your readers on this topic is a book called "Practice Perfect," by Doug Lemov, et al. One of the best books I have ever read for how to get better at anything.

  9. Do your homework or someone who has might just eat your lunch. In the competitive world it doesn't take long for others of high caliber to figure out what someone else is doing or not doing ....strategy. I feel the best is knowing where we are and doing our best to keep finely tuned, maintain forward progress. Self disc is tough 24/7 but not impossible, desire to be the best and you will be the best you can be.

  10. Do your homework or someone who has might just eat your lunch. In the competitive world it doesn't take long for others of high caliber to figure out what someone else is doing or not doing ....strategy. I feel the best is knowing where we are and doing our best to keep finely tuned, maintain forward progress. Self disc is tough 24/7 but not impossible, desire to be the best and you will be the best you can be.

  11. BroVic  A different perspective is while you practice you may if your open to it, discover things you might have overlooked when actually doing the practiced activity. For example when I was training to receive my black belt in the martial arts, there were many times where time was short, so short I didn't have the needed time to think if I wanted to survive. What I did have was the experience and  awareness (open to) areas where I may improve. This became something I would look forward to doing because I found places to improve. Had I been caught up in the emotions of intense actions I probably would have continued fight others. When I turned Inward I began to learn much more about me, how I operate, to overcome myself. That is where practice is valuable. Not perfect practice but practice with an awareness of what is right and what is wrong. Take to the tough road and do what is right, you'll be happier for it. I my case I got to a whole new understanding.

  12. your speeching is affact me,i worried of Hierarchical network but now i know network marketing is different, and i want change my life, but i worried about sell or set network marketing?? i dont know what am i do?

  13. Hi randy gage i like your speeches . you are great at them .. hope i can see you in one meeting that you are speaking .. my attitude is that i myself do it someday soon.. and i wink you when you are siting on the chair judging..

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  • 33 comments on “How You Win”

    1. Makes me think of the interview with the basketball player, I forget his name. I think he was disrespecting the team and its leadership by acting too good for and not needing to practice. Anyway in the interview he kept saying "PRACTICE!?" And "We talking about PRACTICE!?"
      Anyway, yea I dig it man. If we don't use it we lose it. Great post. Cool story. I can totally see you turning down that fat fee too. Good for you. I dig it.

    2. Presentations. I have done many, yet as you mentioned yourself, it has been over 6 months since my last one and I feel like amateurs again preparing for it. Therefore I see now, that although I may not have a presentation scheduled, consistently, I must consistently visit the techniques involved with the entire process, in order to keep up "my game". This message couldn't have came at a better time. Thanks Randy

    3. Refusing your check for the speech brings the principle of fair exchange of value to another level.  Very interesting way to think about it.  Thanks for the post!

    4. Great post, Randy!
      About as professional as it gets. It's interesting how important it to keep our skills sharp.
      I'm sure next time you are up on the platform your going to blow them away... Get back in that overnight seminar shape and you'll be good to go.
      As Always, Here's to Your LifetoSuccess,
      God Bless You,
      John Clark - http://www.lifetosuccess.com

    5. Stephen Covey lists' Sharpen Your Axe' as one of the seven principles of highly effective people. And who can forgot the 300 dialogue- 'More you sweat at the practise ground less you bleed in the battle'

    6. This is reminiscent of my early studies with Ram Dass, who always reminded of this very old Buddhist saying "Before enlightenment, carrying water and chopping wood. After enlightenment, carrying water and chopping wood". As for myself I must continue to learn and Let Go of resistance in all it's many forms as I work on the development of a breakthrough in storytelling that affects people of all types.. "The beat goes on.."

    7. You know, Randy, this post triggered a thought in me. Practice takes so much time and energy. Even if you're an expert in whatever field - be it in the sciences, the arts, sports or entertainment - you just have to practice to stay at the top of your game. So, the question is: Am I willing to spend this much time, effort and resources on practicing on THIS? Practice can be dull and routine, and it can be painful, which brings out another question: Do I love what I do ENOUGH, to spend this much time practicing?

    8. Great post. Spot on. When I was a TOPGUN fighter pilot instructor years ago, we used to say that "Everyone wants to win. Not everyone is willing to prepare to win." I have always tried to remember that in my post-Navy career. A great resource for your readers on this topic is a book called "Practice Perfect," by Doug Lemov, et al. One of the best books I have ever read for how to get better at anything.

    9. Do your homework or someone who has might just eat your lunch. In the competitive world it doesn't take long for others of high caliber to figure out what someone else is doing or not doing ....strategy. I feel the best is knowing where we are and doing our best to keep finely tuned, maintain forward progress. Self disc is tough 24/7 but not impossible, desire to be the best and you will be the best you can be.

    10. Do your homework or someone who has might just eat your lunch. In the competitive world it doesn't take long for others of high caliber to figure out what someone else is doing or not doing ....strategy. I feel the best is knowing where we are and doing our best to keep finely tuned, maintain forward progress. Self disc is tough 24/7 but not impossible, desire to be the best and you will be the best you can be.

    11. BroVic  A different perspective is while you practice you may if your open to it, discover things you might have overlooked when actually doing the practiced activity. For example when I was training to receive my black belt in the martial arts, there were many times where time was short, so short I didn't have the needed time to think if I wanted to survive. What I did have was the experience and  awareness (open to) areas where I may improve. This became something I would look forward to doing because I found places to improve. Had I been caught up in the emotions of intense actions I probably would have continued fight others. When I turned Inward I began to learn much more about me, how I operate, to overcome myself. That is where practice is valuable. Not perfect practice but practice with an awareness of what is right and what is wrong. Take to the tough road and do what is right, you'll be happier for it. I my case I got to a whole new understanding.

    12. your speeching is affact me,i worried of Hierarchical network but now i know network marketing is different, and i want change my life, but i worried about sell or set network marketing?? i dont know what am i do?

    13. Hi randy gage i like your speeches . you are great at them .. hope i can see you in one meeting that you are speaking .. my attitude is that i myself do it someday soon.. and i wink you when you are siting on the chair judging..

    Leave a Reply to Hersh Bhardwaj Cancel reply

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