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Take the Stairs

Posted By: Randy GageFebruary 7, 2012

Becoming rich is hard.  But you know what’s harder?  Being poor. 

And it’s not just becoming wealthy.  This is true for whatever definition you would use for success.  It’s hard.  But failure is even harder.

So which would you prefer?

Assuming you make the choice for success, there’s a great new book you should get that's releasing today.  It’s from my colleague and good friend Rory Vaden, and it’s titled, Take the Stairs. 

Yes taking the escalator is easier, but taking the stairs is better for you.  I was fortunate to get an advance copy of the book to read, and Rory uses the stairs analogy to help you plot out the self-discipline and actions you need to take to create the life and success you desire.  It’s a great read and it will help you.  Get it and let me know what you think.

-RG

53 comments on “Take the Stairs”

  1. Becoming rich is hard. But you know what’s harder? Being poor.

    Love that - promise yourself you will never give up and just by doing this - you have lived a life of growth..

  2. Want to know what's also almost as bad as being poor? Being totally passive about your life and living it based on the swiftly becoming outdated idea of a career.Following the instruction manual which your parents passed down from generation to generation. Unless you were born wealthy or had open-minded parents, or created value, it's likely unless you are or have done something awesome you are either on the career path or you are struggling to get into one.Being mediocre and allowing someone else to determine your self-worth and how far you go in life is the path the vast majority of people are in. However, some are stuck in hand-to-mouth mode, or even worse, a downward spiral of despair and gloom.Obviously in today's world unless you work for the government or are a member of a Union, or are well-connected, it is unlikely unless you are working for a progressive business, you are going to receive the "free" pension and lifetime of company loyalty my grandparents' generation received.Even Union businesses lay people off in times of trouble or to increase profit, and last year the government employee debacle in Wisconsin proves that not even a "good" government job is secure. A big trend I have observed is for people to go back to college if they dropped out or never went, or get an MBA or a PHD. This approach is fine if you're doing it for yourself, but most people are doing it to impress a potential employer. In today's world there are millions of unemployed/under employed people, many of them with educations and advanced degrees from expensive schools. How are you going to stand out?Someone's always going to have better education/experience/connectionshttp://theskooloflife.com/wordpress/corporate-america-myths/Now, obviously business itself is not evil, and some companies do care about their employees and want them to be happy so they are more productive.Settling for comfort and and so-so."Well, my life may suck, but at least I grind it out enough to own a nice big screen TV and can pay for cable TV."

  3. Want to know what's also almost as bad as being poor? Being totally passive about your life and living it based on the swiftly becoming outdated idea of a career.Following the instruction manual which your parents passed down from generation to generation. Unless you were born wealthy or had open-minded parents, or created value, it's likely unless you are or have done something awesome you are either on the career path or you are struggling to get into one.Being mediocre and allowing someone else to determine your self-worth and how far you go in life is the path the vast majority of people are in. However, some are stuck in hand-to-mouth mode, or even worse, a downward spiral of despair and gloom.Obviously in today's world unless you work for the government or are a member of a Union, or are well-connected, it is unlikely unless you are working for a progressive business, you are going to receive the "free" pension and lifetime of company loyalty my grandparents' generation received.Even Union businesses lay people off in times of trouble or to increase profit, and last year the government employee debacle in Wisconsin proves that not even a "good" government job is secure. A big trend I have observed is for people to go back to college if they dropped out or never went, or get an MBA or a PHD. This approach is fine if you're doing it for yourself, but most people are doing it to impress a potential employer. In today's world there are millions of unemployed/under employed people, many of them with educations and advanced degrees from expensive schools. How are you going to stand out?Someone's always going to have better education/experience/connectionshttp://theskooloflife.com/wordpress/corporate-america-myths

    Now, obviously business itself is not evil, and some companies do care about their employees and want them to be happy so they are more productive.Settling for comfort and and so-so."Well, my life may suck, but at least I grind it out enough to own a nice big screen TV and can pay for cable TV."

  4. Want to know what's also almost as bad as being poor? Being totally passive about your life and living it based on the swiftly becoming outdated idea of a career.Following the instruction manual which your parents passed down from generation to generation. Unless you were born wealthy or had open-minded parents, or created value, it's likely unless you are or have done something awesome you are either on the career path or you are struggling to get into one.Being mediocre and allowing someone else to determine your self-worth and how far you go in life is the path the vast majority of people are in. However, some are stuck in hand-to-mouth mode, or even worse, a downward spiral of despair and gloom.Obviously in today's world unless you work for the government or are a member of a Union, or are well-connected, it is unlikely unless you are working for a progressive business, you are going to receive the "free" pension and lifetime of company loyalty my grandparents' generation received.Even Union businesses lay people off in times of trouble or to increase profit, and last year the government employee debacle in Wisconsin proves that not even a "good" government job is secure. A big trend I have observed is for people to go back to college if they dropped out or never went, or get an MBA or a PHD. This approach is fine if you're doing it for yourself, but most people are doing it to impress a potential employer. In today's world there are millions of unemployed/under employed people, many of them with educations and advanced degrees from expensive schools. How are you going to stand out?Someone's always going to have better education/experience/connectionshttp://theskooloflife.com/wordpress/corporate-america-myths

    Now, obviously business itself is not evil, and some companies do care about their employees and want them to be happy so they are more productive.Settling for comfort and and so-so."Well, my life may suck, but at least I grind it out enough to own a nice big screen TV and can pay for cable TV."

      1. @Randy_Gage Maybe it's a technical problem on my end somewhere. It doesn't seem to maintain the formatting of my paragraphs after I post.It is possible that I am doing something incorrectly, or my browser (Chrome) has some flaws in the way in which it renders things. Every browser has its flaws.

  5. @Randy_Gage Maybe it's a technical problem on my end somewhere. It doesn't seem to maintain the formatting of my paragraphs after I post.It is possible that I am doing something incorrectly, or my browser (Chrome) has some flaws in the way in which it renders things. Every browser has its flaws.

  6. You are right @Randy_Gage that failure is harder. We refer to the concept as The Paradox Principle of Sacrifice which states that: "Easy short term choices lead to difficult long term consequences meanwhile difficult short term choices lead to easy long term consequences." The great paradox is that what seemed like the easy better thing to do (buy on credit, be flippant, indulge in any sort of temptation) when applied repeatedly creates the much more difficult life. And vice versa the things that we thought were harder (saving money, working out, making healthier choices) played out over time create the much easier life of freedom, peace, wealth, and happiness. So procrastination and indulgence become creditors that charge us interest.

    Thanks for the post.

  7. You are right @Randy_Gage that failure is harder. We refer to the concept as The Paradox Principle of Sacrifice which states that: "Easy short term choices lead to difficult long term consequences meanwhile difficult short term choices lead to easy long term consequences." The great paradox is that what seemed like the easy better thing to do (buy on credit, be flippant, indulge in any sort of temptation) when applied repeatedly creates the much more difficult life. And vice versa the things that we thought were harder (saving money, working out, making healthier choices) played out over time create the much easier life of freedom, peace, wealth, and happiness. So procrastination and indulgence become creditors that charge us interest.

    Thanks for the post.

  8. So here is a question that I'd love to hear everybody's thoughts on... how do we know what is a healthy amount of reward versus where do we draw the line on what is just purely indulgent and unhealthy?

  9. So here is a question that I'd love to hear everybody's thoughts on... how do we know what is a healthy amount of reward versus where do we draw the line on what is just purely indulgent and unhealthy?

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  • 53 comments on “Take the Stairs”

    1. Becoming rich is hard. But you know what’s harder? Being poor.

      Love that - promise yourself you will never give up and just by doing this - you have lived a life of growth..

    2. Want to know what's also almost as bad as being poor? Being totally passive about your life and living it based on the swiftly becoming outdated idea of a career.Following the instruction manual which your parents passed down from generation to generation. Unless you were born wealthy or had open-minded parents, or created value, it's likely unless you are or have done something awesome you are either on the career path or you are struggling to get into one.Being mediocre and allowing someone else to determine your self-worth and how far you go in life is the path the vast majority of people are in. However, some are stuck in hand-to-mouth mode, or even worse, a downward spiral of despair and gloom.Obviously in today's world unless you work for the government or are a member of a Union, or are well-connected, it is unlikely unless you are working for a progressive business, you are going to receive the "free" pension and lifetime of company loyalty my grandparents' generation received.Even Union businesses lay people off in times of trouble or to increase profit, and last year the government employee debacle in Wisconsin proves that not even a "good" government job is secure. A big trend I have observed is for people to go back to college if they dropped out or never went, or get an MBA or a PHD. This approach is fine if you're doing it for yourself, but most people are doing it to impress a potential employer. In today's world there are millions of unemployed/under employed people, many of them with educations and advanced degrees from expensive schools. How are you going to stand out?Someone's always going to have better education/experience/connectionshttp://theskooloflife.com/wordpress/corporate-america-myths/Now, obviously business itself is not evil, and some companies do care about their employees and want them to be happy so they are more productive.Settling for comfort and and so-so."Well, my life may suck, but at least I grind it out enough to own a nice big screen TV and can pay for cable TV."

    3. Want to know what's also almost as bad as being poor? Being totally passive about your life and living it based on the swiftly becoming outdated idea of a career.Following the instruction manual which your parents passed down from generation to generation. Unless you were born wealthy or had open-minded parents, or created value, it's likely unless you are or have done something awesome you are either on the career path or you are struggling to get into one.Being mediocre and allowing someone else to determine your self-worth and how far you go in life is the path the vast majority of people are in. However, some are stuck in hand-to-mouth mode, or even worse, a downward spiral of despair and gloom.Obviously in today's world unless you work for the government or are a member of a Union, or are well-connected, it is unlikely unless you are working for a progressive business, you are going to receive the "free" pension and lifetime of company loyalty my grandparents' generation received.Even Union businesses lay people off in times of trouble or to increase profit, and last year the government employee debacle in Wisconsin proves that not even a "good" government job is secure. A big trend I have observed is for people to go back to college if they dropped out or never went, or get an MBA or a PHD. This approach is fine if you're doing it for yourself, but most people are doing it to impress a potential employer. In today's world there are millions of unemployed/under employed people, many of them with educations and advanced degrees from expensive schools. How are you going to stand out?Someone's always going to have better education/experience/connectionshttp://theskooloflife.com/wordpress/corporate-america-myths

      Now, obviously business itself is not evil, and some companies do care about their employees and want them to be happy so they are more productive.Settling for comfort and and so-so."Well, my life may suck, but at least I grind it out enough to own a nice big screen TV and can pay for cable TV."

    4. Want to know what's also almost as bad as being poor? Being totally passive about your life and living it based on the swiftly becoming outdated idea of a career.Following the instruction manual which your parents passed down from generation to generation. Unless you were born wealthy or had open-minded parents, or created value, it's likely unless you are or have done something awesome you are either on the career path or you are struggling to get into one.Being mediocre and allowing someone else to determine your self-worth and how far you go in life is the path the vast majority of people are in. However, some are stuck in hand-to-mouth mode, or even worse, a downward spiral of despair and gloom.Obviously in today's world unless you work for the government or are a member of a Union, or are well-connected, it is unlikely unless you are working for a progressive business, you are going to receive the "free" pension and lifetime of company loyalty my grandparents' generation received.Even Union businesses lay people off in times of trouble or to increase profit, and last year the government employee debacle in Wisconsin proves that not even a "good" government job is secure. A big trend I have observed is for people to go back to college if they dropped out or never went, or get an MBA or a PHD. This approach is fine if you're doing it for yourself, but most people are doing it to impress a potential employer. In today's world there are millions of unemployed/under employed people, many of them with educations and advanced degrees from expensive schools. How are you going to stand out?Someone's always going to have better education/experience/connectionshttp://theskooloflife.com/wordpress/corporate-america-myths

      Now, obviously business itself is not evil, and some companies do care about their employees and want them to be happy so they are more productive.Settling for comfort and and so-so."Well, my life may suck, but at least I grind it out enough to own a nice big screen TV and can pay for cable TV."

        1. @Randy_Gage Maybe it's a technical problem on my end somewhere. It doesn't seem to maintain the formatting of my paragraphs after I post.It is possible that I am doing something incorrectly, or my browser (Chrome) has some flaws in the way in which it renders things. Every browser has its flaws.

    5. @Randy_Gage Maybe it's a technical problem on my end somewhere. It doesn't seem to maintain the formatting of my paragraphs after I post.It is possible that I am doing something incorrectly, or my browser (Chrome) has some flaws in the way in which it renders things. Every browser has its flaws.

    6. You are right @Randy_Gage that failure is harder. We refer to the concept as The Paradox Principle of Sacrifice which states that: "Easy short term choices lead to difficult long term consequences meanwhile difficult short term choices lead to easy long term consequences." The great paradox is that what seemed like the easy better thing to do (buy on credit, be flippant, indulge in any sort of temptation) when applied repeatedly creates the much more difficult life. And vice versa the things that we thought were harder (saving money, working out, making healthier choices) played out over time create the much easier life of freedom, peace, wealth, and happiness. So procrastination and indulgence become creditors that charge us interest.

      Thanks for the post.

    7. You are right @Randy_Gage that failure is harder. We refer to the concept as The Paradox Principle of Sacrifice which states that: "Easy short term choices lead to difficult long term consequences meanwhile difficult short term choices lead to easy long term consequences." The great paradox is that what seemed like the easy better thing to do (buy on credit, be flippant, indulge in any sort of temptation) when applied repeatedly creates the much more difficult life. And vice versa the things that we thought were harder (saving money, working out, making healthier choices) played out over time create the much easier life of freedom, peace, wealth, and happiness. So procrastination and indulgence become creditors that charge us interest.

      Thanks for the post.

    8. So here is a question that I'd love to hear everybody's thoughts on... how do we know what is a healthy amount of reward versus where do we draw the line on what is just purely indulgent and unhealthy?

    9. So here is a question that I'd love to hear everybody's thoughts on... how do we know what is a healthy amount of reward versus where do we draw the line on what is just purely indulgent and unhealthy?

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