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How Prosperous Are Your Beliefs?

Posted By: Randy GageApril 10, 2015

Here in the United States, there’s been a lot of controversy and debate about legislation that many considered protecting religious freedom, while others felt it would legalize discrimination.

 

The most frequent question I’ve been receiving lately is about the prosperity consciousness effects of this issue. So I’d like to leave aside the legal debate for others, but discuss how your beliefs on this issue affect your prosperity.

 

One of the most important steps you ever take to live a life of prosperity and harmony is to live by a congruent philosophy. Meaning you have principles you live by, values that guide them, and you live in congruence with them.

I’ve stated in one of my earlier books that the Libertarian party is the only political entity that stands on a philosophy that honors all humans and is thus grounded in prosperity consciousness. The basis of this philosophy is that all humans are equal, deserve dignity, and have inalienable rights.

While there is a strong and growing core of people who believe in the Libertarian philosophy, it hasn’t yet achieved widespread acceptance anywhere in the world. I believe that is because of the Libertarian positions on drugs, prostitution and sex. They are diametrically opposed to the Puritanical and other religious beliefs espoused by many in the world today.

As Libertarians, we believe any actions between consensual adults – which do not infringe on the rights of others – are the private business of those individuals and no one else.

If my neighbor likes to smoke crack, that’s no business of mine. (Or the government.) However, if he breaks into my home to steal money for his habit, then he has infringed on my rights, and I should be protected by law (government).

Now of course people who use drugs are actually hurting their own bodies and this is a very anti-prosperous behavior. But that is a personal decision that only they should be allowed to make.

If someone wishes to sell themselves as an escort or prostitute, and another person wishes to purchase their services, that is a private transaction between two consenting parties, and it should not be the business of the government or anyone else. Of course anyone exploiting children or human trafficking is infringing on human rights and should be prevented from doing so by the government.

You can make the case that selling your body or buying another’s is not living in prosperity consciousness. But again, the only congruent prosperity philosophy is to allow individuals to make these choices for themselves.

Whether the lady down the street from me is bisexual, asexual, homosexual, polysexual, pansexual, or transsexual is none of my business. For any government to discriminate against, or even worse, prosecute anyone for their sexual orientation is immoral. (And anyone who argues that non-heterosexual people are making lifestyle choices that are immoral or unnatural is simply exposing their monumental ignorance of science and biology. Sexuality is not a choice. It has been conclusively and scientifically proven long ago that sexuality is inherent in your DNA. For more on this, read one of my earlier posts here.)

This takes us to the discussion on the recent legislative controversy, and is where it gets dicey for some…

So what about freedom of religion? Some people have religious beliefs that non-heterosexuality is wrong, and they object to having to serve them in their business; catering a gay wedding for example.

As a Libertarian, I have no problems with this whatsoever. Private businesses are private property and they should be able to exercise their personal human rights on their personal property as they see fit.

If a business wants to hang a sign in their window that says, “We don’t serve fags, negroes or Jews,” I don’t have any problem with that. In fact I for one would actually prefer that they do that. Then I would know how they feel, and wouldn’t spend my money with them. Likewise, if a Muslim businessman refuses to do business with a woman, because he believes women should be property of their husbands, that is his right.

I think this type of behavior is vile, despicable, and ignorant and certainly anti-prosperity. But if I live my life by a congruent philosophy – which I do – I have to support other people’s rights to behave in ways that are vile, despicable and ignorant in their personal lives and on their private property.

The people in these examples above are programmed to believe that they are somehow superior to other humans because of their sex, sexuality, gender, race or religion. They are operating at lower consciousness and living their lives within the confines of that consciousness. If you support human rights, you have to support their right to be vile, despicable and ignorant. And if you believe in prosperity consciousness, hope to change them with education, empathy and love.

The problem arises when governments get involved and legalize discrimination and persecution of individuals based on their sex, sexuality, race or religion. This is immoral and all people of prosperity consciousness must stand up for those who are being denied their basic human rights.

But it cuts the other way too. If a photographer, singer or caterer doesn’t want to work a same-sex wedding, no one should be allowed to force them to. This would a violation of their human rights.

There is no such thing as gay rights, woman’s rights, or minority (of any kind) rights; there are only human rights. To use terms such as these implies that gay people, women, or minorities are asking for special rights. They’re not. They are simply demanding the basic rights that ALL humans must be afforded in an enlightened society.

If you live by a congruent philosophy of prosperity consciousness, you can never support denying inalienable human rights to anyone – regardless of their sex, sexuality, race, religion, gender or any other criteria.

In all the debate on the proposed legislation Indiana and other states, here’s the prosperity concept that I believe has been missed and needs to be addressed…

Millions of Americans have no problem with someone refusing to cater a same-sex wedding on religious grounds. But that opinion could never be held in an enlightened society. Because if you believe that is moral and acceptable, by any standard of logic you’d have to also believe it would be acceptable to refuse to cater a wedding of a black man and women, an Asian man and woman, or an interracial wedding. There was a time beliefs such as these were widely accepted, thanks in great part to religious doctrines and dogma.

Fortunately society has evolved over the centuries. Since the time of the Enlightenment, people of higher consciousness have driven the dialogue and our morality has developed to the point where most people no longer support slavery, or bans on interracial marriages. They believe women are equal and have the right to vote, get educated, and own property. This evolution in thinking and consciousness has moved us ever closer to a more just world.

It would appear the greatest stumbling block today preventing society from reaching enlightenment is organized religion. There are literally billions of humans who still believe in Stone Age, sky god mysticism.

And while this irrational behavior is sometimes comforting and leads people to service, for the most part it is teaching and propagating hate, intolerance, and judgment. And much, much worse, it is enslaving and killing people.

The Ku Klux Klan supports subjugating and killing people based upon their race. It was and still is driven by religious zealots who believe they are holding to Christian morality.

The Islamic State supports enslaving women, burning people alive in cages, throwing homosexuals off of buildings, beheading aid workers, and crucifying children. There are lots of apologists in the west who allege that the Islamic State isn’t Islamic, but that is simply delusional ignorance. The actions they are taking are completely driven by the religious beliefs they hold.

Other Muslim countries practice varying degrees of Sharia law, where woman are considered property and can be put to death for sins such as getting an education. Non-heterosexuals, apostates, and non-believers are murdered with the approval of the government, or sometimes by the government.

There are people bombing abortion clinics and murdering doctors because of their Christian beliefs. Like Islam, the holy books of Christianity and Judaism are filled with savagery, barbarianism and promote killing non-heterosexuals.

To take any of them literally requires a suspension of rationality no less than those who still believe in Totemism, Zeus, Neptune, Middle Paleolithic bear worship, or the Scientologists who believe 75 million years ago Xenu brought billions of people to Earth in spacecraft resembling DC8 airplanes and dropped them into volcanoes.

Everyone has a right to believe whatever outlandish things they want. But we have to face the reality that the religious beliefs in the world today are dangerous.

At some point, an enlightened society has to say, “enough.” People of consciousness have to question the foundational beliefs they hold, including the ones they were taught by their religion. Think of the skepticism you felt the last time you were watching a late-night infomercial pitch on TV. If you would apply the same critical thinking skills to evaluate the religious beliefs you blindly accepted – would those beliefs withstand the scrutiny?

A sane person with a rational mind not infected with memes would quickly discern most religious beliefs are based upon centuries-old fear, phobias, and superstitions. But I understand the allure and get how we sometimes willingly suspend our disbelief...

Religion provides comfort to millions. If a mother and father lose their four-year-old daughter to leukemia and they take solace and comfort believing there’s another angel in heaven, I for one don’t want to take that away from them.

I have no delusions that I’m going to convince the 1.6 billion Muslims to renounce their faith, persuade Scientologists that their beliefs are crazy, or prove to my Mormon friends that their underwear doesn’t really have magic powers. And I have no desire to do any of this...

I’m not one of the militant atheists out to argue everyone’s religious beliefs. I find my spiritual experience in the manner I do, and I hope everyone else finds their spiritual sustenance in a way that sustains them.

However, if you believe in prosperity consciousness and desire a world of peace and prosperity – then you must live by a congruent philosophy that supports this. And that means you have to be willing to do the difficult critical thinking of questioning your foundational beliefs. And most specifically, any beliefs you adopted from your religion that apply to human rights.

To discriminate, persecute or deny basic human rights to anyone on the basis of their gender, religion, race, sex, or sexual identity is a crime against all humanity.  There is no holy book on earth that can make these crimes right. They deny prosperity to both the oppressed and the oppressors and have no place in an enlightened and prosperous society. 

Everyone likes to believe they are a free thinker.  But to be one, you have to actually exercise that power.  So as the debate rages on the merits of legislation in Indiana, Arkansas and Louisiana, I hope you’ll step back from the legal wrangling and consider the more important issues:

  • What are your beliefs?
  • Do they provide for inalienable human rights for all?
  • And do they take us closer to a world of enlightenment and prosperity?

-RG

44 comments on “How Prosperous Are Your Beliefs?”

  1. Critical thinking?  That's a very tall order for a planet of 6 billion shaved apes to engage in, but we can always dream.  Randy, you know that would be the end of several things - "reality" TV, all religionsas, pundits,  political parties, cancer, obesity, and fat, old, bald guys wearing ponytails and Speedo's.
    I can often convince my Christian friends to support gay marriage.  I just tell them, "Why should heterosexuals be the only ones miserable?".
    And in regards to your prostitute/escort service comment, I only have one question - do you have any phone numbers?  (And stop stating in your post references about your neighbor and crack; someone is going to put two and two together and realize it's me, resulting in a SWAT team kicking down my door).

  2. Agreed on most points. I don't agree with the health issue. If people do health endangering things to their bodies, in the long run, we will all pay for this. They become liabilities to all of us later on. We have to accommodate them at their self inflictied disabilities later on.

  3. Other questions a person needs to ask include; 
    Do you understand your beliefs and political affiliations? Do you stand for something good everyday no matter what your doing? Too many people claim a relationship with a religion they don't understand or compromise on their values at work. 
    Yes, I agree. If I may summarize; Do business with people who like you and/or accept you, but also do no harm.

  4. kayenta I agree with this wholeheartedly.  The major problem with Libertarianism is the belief that most humans can think for themselves.  This is the furthest thing from the truth (if that were the case, we wouldn't have religion, police officers, self-help books, Internet gurus, and the biggest example - Randy would not have had to do this post).  There is not a single person who engages in risky behavior (extreme sports, poor eating habits, drug use, smoking, and on and on) that thinks society shouldn't have to take care of them when those behaviors result in debilitating medical problems.  I believe people should be allowed to smoke as much as they want, but if they get lung cancer as a result of it and they don't have the money to treat it properly, I guess the shit has just hit the fan for them.  If someone wants to travel 100 mph down the highway on a motorcycle without a helmet and they wind up running off the road resulting in a vegetative state, should I be responsible financially for the care of that person?
    Libertarianism would be a great political model to follow except for one thing - HUMANS CAN NEVER ACCEPT THAT THEY ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR ACTIONS.  It would take a lot of heads being pulled out of a lot of asses before we ever get to the principles of Libertarianism.  Christ, nearly everyone I speak to knows who Honey Boo Boo is, but cannot name even one of their two US  Senators.  I think we are a long way from ever hoping humans will think critically and rationally, and stop thinking emotionally and superstitiously.

  5. RG, I agree with the premise of your argument. It's hard to challenge the libertarian philosophy. The reason I've publicly attacked this so-called religious freedom law is it is yet another attempt by the far right to marginalize and further isolate the gay community. This bigotry has to be challenged in the same way it was for blacks in the 1960's, and its proponents need to be called to the table. The gay community has been maligned for long enough, all for the crime of being born with a minority sexual predisposition. I've fought for my friends in the gay community all over the world for years, and I'll continue to do so until the discrimination ends. There is still a substantial percentage of the heterosexual population that is being brainwashed to believe gay people CHOOSE to be gay, and we both know its coming from the church. It's wrong, Randy, and we need to fight it.

  6. Very interesting and thought provoking post which I mostly concur with. I think when you talk about religions and the actions that happen as a result of religious beliefs you are quite right. However there is a very fine line between interpreting ones religion (whatever it is) in the way that the majority perceive it to be and interpreting it in way only a few perceive it as their truth. I'm thinking Islamic State for example who whilst they may be convinced they are following Islam to the fundamental core, the majority of Muslims don't see Islam in the same way. I guess it's true of all religions really. Interpretation is up to each individual. You then get individuals who think and believe the same and tens become hundreds and hundreds become millions. Religion itself was made by man (Napoleon Bonaparte said this) and I think that's true. 
    If in order to be congruent with our values and beliefs we must indeed accept that each individual has a fundamental human right to their own beliefs no matter how vile, inhuman and despicable their beliefs appear to us. We are, on the whole, quick to judge others based on our own indoctrinated belief systems. Obviously those who impinge on the human rights of others need to answer to higher powers such as the legal system etc. But then it gets confusing because if we say everyone has the right to their own beliefs but as a result they cause a grievance against another's humans rights, are we then saying that one human right cancels out the other? I'm not so sure it's so black and white. 
    We are each of course responsible for your own own thoughts words and actions and I believe that LOVE (of self and others) is the fundamental path to enlightenment (but then I am a hippy!) 🙂
    I've got to an age now where I don't listen to the the news, have no TV and don't read the papers. Not because I want to be in a bubble but because I believe that everything is an illusion and what really matters is what is in ones heart and how you behave on an individual level. This frees one up, I feel, to become more enlightened thus being able to then connect to others and be the change we want to see. 

    Jo

    ps I have no idea what the issues are regarding Indiana 🙂

  7. I pretty much agree with everything you've said here, except that the major resistance to the Libertarian Party is its position on drugs, prostitution and sex. Certainly that's the issue for some people, but I think the more universal truth is the proverbial problem with third-party politics in the U.S., which is that, particularly at a national level, a vote for the LP candidate is a vote taken away from your 2nd choice candidate, which makes it all the more likely that your 3rd (last) choice candidate will win, i.e., a libertarian Republican would see a vote for Gary Johnson as a vote taken away from Rand Paul, therefore making it more likely that Hillary Clinton will win.
    Like it or not, elections are a zero-sum game, and for most people, their fear of the negative (the worst possible candidate in their mind) is greater than the desire for the best possible candidate. Combine that with a lack of faith/trust that at least 35-40% of the population will take that same leap of faith and vote for the Libertarian candidate, and there you have it.  Zero-sum game + fear of pain outweighing desire of gain.
    I thought Johnson really nailed it, though, with his 2012 campaign. "Be Libertarian With Me"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KuZ1taqikC8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3v-ZTKZgz4

  8. Thanks Randy for all your posts. I  swallow them every time and have a continuous feeling of admiration and gratitude to you for being my mentor. This time as usual my beliefs coincide with yours as I am convinced that all the humans have rights to have rights and have them inalienable (dear Randy, thanks for the new word) and protected. You have written about things that are not the point of one's choice but  even if something like bad habits a person choose for himself I would never infringe on.  I am learning from you to make people's lives better helping them to overcome difficulties if they want. Thanks again Randy. I will live rich and prosperous!!!

  9. Whew - left me with a ton to chew on! Foundational right and wrong is key. Human rights is a fairly easy issue and smaller government with fewer laws and enforcers was a prime concern of our country's founders. Taking that into the reality of today's life - interesting. On target and the biggest challenge for me is to let go and "And if you believe in prosperity consciousness, hope to change them with education, empathy and love." I repeat. Whew!

  10. Randy_Gage kayenta Thanks for your reply. So tell me, does the libertarian society have any sort of safety net? What happens when a house, that has never ever been in a flood, suddenly gets wiped out by a flood (because of climate change) and there was no provision made for this? Does the libertarian society have a way to help such a person temporarily? What happens if a child is born with huge birth defects and cannot live on its own? Who helps out in such cases? Or in cases of mental illness...I am still learning about Libertarianism.

  11. When the government starts to get involved in any manner around this subject... WATCH OUT!!! In today's day and age, no one should be forced to do anything against their will as long as their actions do not infringe on the rights of others.
    When the government gets involved, it stifles speech and actions. I would rather people be who they really are instead of being something different because the government says so. When people are honest about who they are, then at least you know where they are coming from and you can decide whether you want to do business with them or not. The same applies to the business owners, I would rather they be honest about who they are, so I can decide whether I want to do business with them or not.
    Is it reasonable to expect a gay printer to be forced to print signs that say, "God hates fags" similar to what the Westboro Church would use in their protests? Or for that matter, if I owned a print shop, I would refuse to take that print job. Is it right for the government to make me do that print job?
    Interesting subject, but I think everyone should be honest about who they are so we know where they are coming from.
    As Always, Here's to Your LifetoSuccess,
    God Bless You,
    John Clark - http://www.lifetosuccess.com

  12. Great post Randy, and I think this material made for one of the most interesting chapters in Why You're Dumb Sick and Broke.  Ultimately, in my opinion this all comes down to people understanding the need for a rational morality, and understanding the actual meaning of an enlightened self-interest (selfishness) versus the abhorrent teachings of altruism and self-sacrifice.  As a former Catholic it took a long time to question those beliefs I had learned growing up, and it was almost frightening to learn what I had been advocating (unknowingly) my whole life.  Thanks for spreading the message on the importance of philosophy, because "who needs it?"  Everyone needs it.
    🙂

  13. Randy- the biggest obstacle for the Libertarian party is that Libertarians oppose the global war machine and the US acting as general manager of the world. Big money behind it all.

  14. Randy_Gage kayenta Randy, what socialistic systems would you eliminate now -police, firemen, libraries, veteran hospitals, etc., and how would you replace them?  I often hear people make grandiose proclamations but don't have any idea what definitive system they would use to replace the current "bad" system.  Case in point, when the Daily Show (yeah, I know, they are fake news but they are usually more accurate than the real news) went to a Tea Party Convention and asked the attendees what government programs they would cut (as you know, The Tea Party are big on substantial reduction in government spending) they could not come up with a single program they wanted eliminated or even reduced.  Not one of them said they wanted spending reductions for the top three most expensive programs - Social Security, Military, and Medicare.  Just goes to show that humans (especially the ones that bitch the most and the loudest) have no conception on how to remedy the problems they are bitching about.

  15. With respect. The above commentary is somewhat navel gazing. Even in a democracy there will still be some who hijack the government to create industries for the Plutocracy to the legal exclusion of others.  This is not anti prosperity but an acknowledgement of certain realities.  The semi conductor industry or the internet would not have exploded without early government support.  How does the whole of society benefit from something that collective resources were used for. (note: Bill Gates Sr. advocates for Inheritance Taxation)
    On a separate topic, industries that are unfair (addictive chemicals) in the marketplace can not be sold in a true free market.  If I make you addicted, you're no longer making a choice.  Similarly, in a nation of laws we need to determine if certain activities can be regulated in courts.

    If a woman (or man) enters into a contract to engage in 10 sex acts for a car and then crashes the car and has no money to pay, is she/he going to be legally required to perform the service?  Big questions.  While in principle I agree with the fundamental principles of the Libertarian Party there are some realities that need to be addressed before the Party can be taken seriously.
    Signed,
    Life Long Libertarian.

  16. troyapeterson people always argue against Libertarianism by showing it is not perfect.  It's not.  But it is a better alternative to what he have.  -RG

  17. pandkenterprises Randy_Gage kayenta  The focus of this thread is on the morel and ethical issues we face as a society, so I don;t want it to turn into a debate on the Libertarian party.  But the basic answer is we support an army to protect the country, a police force to protect private property, and a court system to adjudicate disputes.  -RG

  18. Randy_Gage pandkenterprises kayenta I get it now - so status quo. My intent is not to get into a debate regarding Libertarian doctrine for, I too, hold the opinion that it is the best political system.  But, and I'm sure you will agree, any system is only as good as the people who run it.  The biggest problem with America isn't so much the political party that is running it as it is the apathy of its citizens.  Until people get their asses out of their La-Z-Boy chairs and diligently work for a better system, nothing will change regardless who's running the country.
    I do want to give you kudos on this post.  It is one of the best ones I have seen you write and the responses prove it.  Most of your posts are succinct without much controversy, and the responses from your followers are superficial ("Thanks, Randy"; "I love you Randy"; "You are the best thing since sliced bread"; "Will you have my baby, Randy?", etc.).  This one got people questioning their own beliefs and thinking for themselves, which is a monumental task.  Have you ever thought of running for President (after you have made baby, of course)?

  19. troyapeterson Troy, very thought-provoking post.  By the way, I have a car I am not using.  Do you know a woman who needs one (and I promise not to crash it)?

  20. Randy_Gage troyapeterson I make no arguments against it, in fact, i actively lobby for it. I agree it's the only prosperity focused game in town.  My framing is meant more to juxtapose the idealized vs. the practical political and legal realities of our current environment.  I'd argue that it's not only the best alternative to what we have but the only legitimate alternative which is why I hope the thought leaders in this space will consider these problems in their political copy. 🙂

  21. My brain is hurting and yet not hurting from reading this post. The content and topic is so poignant to studying and attracting true prosperity consciousness. Thankyou for that!
    I'd say you make a relevant point about free thinkers using that power to stay congruent and actually be true free thinkers.
    am grateful to have the right to choose not to stay in rapore with people who clearly demonstrate disregard for their own health and prosperity, and have zero desire to attract prosperity, or love those of us who do.
    ie: when my gut tells me self love isn't there, in people, they get little attention from me, if they don't indicate openness and willingness to learn
    you're right, people have the right to believe what they want, I can still pursue friendships and try to educate them; if I'm comfortable doing so.
    empathy, love and compassion don't have to be directly interactive to be effective

    a person can remain detached and live and let live, yet still empathize and have compassion..

    I've witnessed at least two instances where parents have put their childs well being in jeopardy because of their "vices" and mindlessness, it's repulsive and disgusting..

    I simply withdraw my support, usually.. cause people get peeved if you convey to them you think you "see" some harmful ways
    of them interacting with - or influencing their kids
    I'm not the "perfect man" and don't pretend to be.. far from it.. I do know what works for my well being, isn't what works for someone else.. and I can respect that..
    simply trying to be the change I want to "see" in the world.. setting a prosperous example after being not being as prosperous as I could have been in the past..
    discipline and wisdom are my two watchwords..

  22. Who should we support if there isn't a Libertarian party available?  
    With the general election coming up in the UK next month I am considering who to vote for, there isn't a libertarian party.  I realise that in the end I have more control over my own prosperity then any of the political parties but there is an influence presented by the party in power so it is worth considering

  23. I am a Christian and a Libertarian. A close reading of the Bible (New Testament) - particularly the words of Jesus - will reveal that all human rights are to be protected and honored. While I agree with much of what you say Randy, it is not true Christianity that is the problem - it is those who distort it and read their own agenda into it, while claiming to be Christians. Jesus never condemned those who practice homosexuality, and neither should any of us!

  24. This is a wonderfully thought out and written post on how and why if we want to live by certain freedoms, we need to accept that others are entitled to do the same. Too many people seem to think that while their "rights" should be protected, those who espouse beliefs that they don't believe in should not have the same rights.

  25. RoseSarko But whose Christianity do you follow?  There are over 30,000 different sects of Christianity (Catholics, Mormons, Lutherans, etc., etc.) and all of them claim to be the only true way to Heaven.  A couple things thing about religious followers, they can cherry pick and delude themselves like no other group.  The crazier the bullshit (Planet Kolob, walking on water, 72 virgins when you die, male deity that is constantly spying on you, Galactic Ruler Xenu, and on and on) the more people want to believe.  Time for human to grow-up and use some common sense.

  26. "The nun’s habit. The priest’s cassock. The Jewish prayer shawl. The Muslim’s skullcap. The saffron robes of the Buddhist monk. All are part of a rich tapestry of human devotion to God.
    Not all such religious vestments are on public display. Some are seen only in places of worship. Temple robes of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, known as the robes of the holy priesthood, are worn only inside Mormon temples and reserved for the highest sacraments of the faith. White symbolizes purity. There is no insignia or rank. The most senior apostle and the newest member are indistinguishable when dressed in the same way. Men and women wear similar clothing. The simple vestments combine religious symbolism with echoes of antiquity reflected in ancient writings from the book of Exodus.
    In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, there are no outer religious vestments in ordinary worship services.
    However, many faithful Latter-day Saints wear a garment under their clothing that has deep religious significance. Similar in design to ordinary modest underclothing, it comes in two pieces and is usually referred to as the “temple garment.”
    Some people incorrectly refer to temple garments as magical or “magic underwear.” These words are not only inaccurate but also offensive to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There is nothing magical or mystical about temple garments, and Church members ask for the same degree of respect and sensitivity that would be afforded to any other faith by people of goodwill." and Mormon garments are no different. Mormons do not believe they are "magical" like you stated. Ask you're friends who you say you have that are Mormon.

  27. Randy, I agree with every word of yours!
    what I love most was:  
    ".....And if you believe in prosperity consciousness, hope to change them with education, empathy and love".
    Amen!

  28. pandkenterprises RoseSarko Good question....not sure what it's called, so I guess it's my version - LOL!  I follow the teaching of Jesus, which are coherent with my Libertarian beliefs. Jesus preached tolerance, love, and forgiveness, and that we are all equal in the eyes of God. Unfortunately many of his teachings have been twisted around by various sects (as you mentioned). Case in point: I recently tried out a new church, which appealed to me because on their website they focused on New Testament Christianity. However, upon attending, I was disappointed that it was the same old "homosexuality is evil," and "women should not be leaders in the church because the Bible says so."  Well, Jesus never said either of these things, and in fact, he had MANY women followers, and from everything I've read, treated women as equal to men (which was very unusual for the times). I agree with a lot of Randy's teachings. But those of you on here bashing Christianity should also look at "the log in your own eye" - you are condemning others for their beliefs just the same as the Christians you are preaching against!

  29. Inalienable rights are rights that can be contracted away (legal definition).  Unalienable rights cannot be.  This is a serious and major flaw in popular writing that should be addressed.  When you promote the concept of unalienable rights while writing inalienable rights you are promoting something which the legal system uses to actually trample your unalienable rights.  I invite you to investigate the difference further.

  30. RoseSarko pandkenterprises I don't care what form of supernatural religion someone wants to believe in.  As a free country (it really isn't, but let's pretend for a moment it is), a person should be free to believe anything he/she wants and not be persecuted about their beliefs.  I believe in ALL of the 27 Amendments (although the 18th and the 21st ace each other out).  Being from Montana, I often hear about the erosion of the 2nd Amendment (the Government is hiding in the shadows waiting to kick our doors in and steal all of our guns!) but no one bitches about separation of Church and State.  Actually, most people don't want separation as long as it is Christianity that is being pushed in our schools.  Again, more cherry picking.  People need to look at religion as they do a pair of shoes - find something that fits you and you are comfortable with (some people, such as myself, feeling comfortable going barefooted), but don't try to make me wear your "shoes".

  31. TheRealMaxCasey Are you from the UK?  I think that may be the case still there.  Here in the States, inalienable evolved from unalienable over the centuries and means "not transferable to another or capable of being repudiated"  -RG

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    1. Critical thinking?  That's a very tall order for a planet of 6 billion shaved apes to engage in, but we can always dream.  Randy, you know that would be the end of several things - "reality" TV, all religionsas, pundits,  political parties, cancer, obesity, and fat, old, bald guys wearing ponytails and Speedo's.
      I can often convince my Christian friends to support gay marriage.  I just tell them, "Why should heterosexuals be the only ones miserable?".
      And in regards to your prostitute/escort service comment, I only have one question - do you have any phone numbers?  (And stop stating in your post references about your neighbor and crack; someone is going to put two and two together and realize it's me, resulting in a SWAT team kicking down my door).

    2. Agreed on most points. I don't agree with the health issue. If people do health endangering things to their bodies, in the long run, we will all pay for this. They become liabilities to all of us later on. We have to accommodate them at their self inflictied disabilities later on.

    3. Other questions a person needs to ask include; 
      Do you understand your beliefs and political affiliations? Do you stand for something good everyday no matter what your doing? Too many people claim a relationship with a religion they don't understand or compromise on their values at work. 
      Yes, I agree. If I may summarize; Do business with people who like you and/or accept you, but also do no harm.

    4. kayenta I agree with this wholeheartedly.  The major problem with Libertarianism is the belief that most humans can think for themselves.  This is the furthest thing from the truth (if that were the case, we wouldn't have religion, police officers, self-help books, Internet gurus, and the biggest example - Randy would not have had to do this post).  There is not a single person who engages in risky behavior (extreme sports, poor eating habits, drug use, smoking, and on and on) that thinks society shouldn't have to take care of them when those behaviors result in debilitating medical problems.  I believe people should be allowed to smoke as much as they want, but if they get lung cancer as a result of it and they don't have the money to treat it properly, I guess the shit has just hit the fan for them.  If someone wants to travel 100 mph down the highway on a motorcycle without a helmet and they wind up running off the road resulting in a vegetative state, should I be responsible financially for the care of that person?
      Libertarianism would be a great political model to follow except for one thing - HUMANS CAN NEVER ACCEPT THAT THEY ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR ACTIONS.  It would take a lot of heads being pulled out of a lot of asses before we ever get to the principles of Libertarianism.  Christ, nearly everyone I speak to knows who Honey Boo Boo is, but cannot name even one of their two US  Senators.  I think we are a long way from ever hoping humans will think critically and rationally, and stop thinking emotionally and superstitiously.

    5. RG, I agree with the premise of your argument. It's hard to challenge the libertarian philosophy. The reason I've publicly attacked this so-called religious freedom law is it is yet another attempt by the far right to marginalize and further isolate the gay community. This bigotry has to be challenged in the same way it was for blacks in the 1960's, and its proponents need to be called to the table. The gay community has been maligned for long enough, all for the crime of being born with a minority sexual predisposition. I've fought for my friends in the gay community all over the world for years, and I'll continue to do so until the discrimination ends. There is still a substantial percentage of the heterosexual population that is being brainwashed to believe gay people CHOOSE to be gay, and we both know its coming from the church. It's wrong, Randy, and we need to fight it.

    6. Very interesting and thought provoking post which I mostly concur with. I think when you talk about religions and the actions that happen as a result of religious beliefs you are quite right. However there is a very fine line between interpreting ones religion (whatever it is) in the way that the majority perceive it to be and interpreting it in way only a few perceive it as their truth. I'm thinking Islamic State for example who whilst they may be convinced they are following Islam to the fundamental core, the majority of Muslims don't see Islam in the same way. I guess it's true of all religions really. Interpretation is up to each individual. You then get individuals who think and believe the same and tens become hundreds and hundreds become millions. Religion itself was made by man (Napoleon Bonaparte said this) and I think that's true. 
      If in order to be congruent with our values and beliefs we must indeed accept that each individual has a fundamental human right to their own beliefs no matter how vile, inhuman and despicable their beliefs appear to us. We are, on the whole, quick to judge others based on our own indoctrinated belief systems. Obviously those who impinge on the human rights of others need to answer to higher powers such as the legal system etc. But then it gets confusing because if we say everyone has the right to their own beliefs but as a result they cause a grievance against another's humans rights, are we then saying that one human right cancels out the other? I'm not so sure it's so black and white. 
      We are each of course responsible for your own own thoughts words and actions and I believe that LOVE (of self and others) is the fundamental path to enlightenment (but then I am a hippy!) 🙂
      I've got to an age now where I don't listen to the the news, have no TV and don't read the papers. Not because I want to be in a bubble but because I believe that everything is an illusion and what really matters is what is in ones heart and how you behave on an individual level. This frees one up, I feel, to become more enlightened thus being able to then connect to others and be the change we want to see. 

      Jo

      ps I have no idea what the issues are regarding Indiana 🙂

    7. I pretty much agree with everything you've said here, except that the major resistance to the Libertarian Party is its position on drugs, prostitution and sex. Certainly that's the issue for some people, but I think the more universal truth is the proverbial problem with third-party politics in the U.S., which is that, particularly at a national level, a vote for the LP candidate is a vote taken away from your 2nd choice candidate, which makes it all the more likely that your 3rd (last) choice candidate will win, i.e., a libertarian Republican would see a vote for Gary Johnson as a vote taken away from Rand Paul, therefore making it more likely that Hillary Clinton will win.
      Like it or not, elections are a zero-sum game, and for most people, their fear of the negative (the worst possible candidate in their mind) is greater than the desire for the best possible candidate. Combine that with a lack of faith/trust that at least 35-40% of the population will take that same leap of faith and vote for the Libertarian candidate, and there you have it.  Zero-sum game + fear of pain outweighing desire of gain.
      I thought Johnson really nailed it, though, with his 2012 campaign. "Be Libertarian With Me"
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KuZ1taqikC8
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3v-ZTKZgz4

    8. Thanks Randy for all your posts. I  swallow them every time and have a continuous feeling of admiration and gratitude to you for being my mentor. This time as usual my beliefs coincide with yours as I am convinced that all the humans have rights to have rights and have them inalienable (dear Randy, thanks for the new word) and protected. You have written about things that are not the point of one's choice but  even if something like bad habits a person choose for himself I would never infringe on.  I am learning from you to make people's lives better helping them to overcome difficulties if they want. Thanks again Randy. I will live rich and prosperous!!!

    9. Whew - left me with a ton to chew on! Foundational right and wrong is key. Human rights is a fairly easy issue and smaller government with fewer laws and enforcers was a prime concern of our country's founders. Taking that into the reality of today's life - interesting. On target and the biggest challenge for me is to let go and "And if you believe in prosperity consciousness, hope to change them with education, empathy and love." I repeat. Whew!

    10. Randy_Gage kayenta Thanks for your reply. So tell me, does the libertarian society have any sort of safety net? What happens when a house, that has never ever been in a flood, suddenly gets wiped out by a flood (because of climate change) and there was no provision made for this? Does the libertarian society have a way to help such a person temporarily? What happens if a child is born with huge birth defects and cannot live on its own? Who helps out in such cases? Or in cases of mental illness...I am still learning about Libertarianism.

    11. When the government starts to get involved in any manner around this subject... WATCH OUT!!! In today's day and age, no one should be forced to do anything against their will as long as their actions do not infringe on the rights of others.
      When the government gets involved, it stifles speech and actions. I would rather people be who they really are instead of being something different because the government says so. When people are honest about who they are, then at least you know where they are coming from and you can decide whether you want to do business with them or not. The same applies to the business owners, I would rather they be honest about who they are, so I can decide whether I want to do business with them or not.
      Is it reasonable to expect a gay printer to be forced to print signs that say, "God hates fags" similar to what the Westboro Church would use in their protests? Or for that matter, if I owned a print shop, I would refuse to take that print job. Is it right for the government to make me do that print job?
      Interesting subject, but I think everyone should be honest about who they are so we know where they are coming from.
      As Always, Here's to Your LifetoSuccess,
      God Bless You,
      John Clark - http://www.lifetosuccess.com

    12. Great post Randy, and I think this material made for one of the most interesting chapters in Why You're Dumb Sick and Broke.  Ultimately, in my opinion this all comes down to people understanding the need for a rational morality, and understanding the actual meaning of an enlightened self-interest (selfishness) versus the abhorrent teachings of altruism and self-sacrifice.  As a former Catholic it took a long time to question those beliefs I had learned growing up, and it was almost frightening to learn what I had been advocating (unknowingly) my whole life.  Thanks for spreading the message on the importance of philosophy, because "who needs it?"  Everyone needs it.
      🙂

    13. Randy- the biggest obstacle for the Libertarian party is that Libertarians oppose the global war machine and the US acting as general manager of the world. Big money behind it all.

    14. Randy_Gage kayenta Randy, what socialistic systems would you eliminate now -police, firemen, libraries, veteran hospitals, etc., and how would you replace them?  I often hear people make grandiose proclamations but don't have any idea what definitive system they would use to replace the current "bad" system.  Case in point, when the Daily Show (yeah, I know, they are fake news but they are usually more accurate than the real news) went to a Tea Party Convention and asked the attendees what government programs they would cut (as you know, The Tea Party are big on substantial reduction in government spending) they could not come up with a single program they wanted eliminated or even reduced.  Not one of them said they wanted spending reductions for the top three most expensive programs - Social Security, Military, and Medicare.  Just goes to show that humans (especially the ones that bitch the most and the loudest) have no conception on how to remedy the problems they are bitching about.

    15. With respect. The above commentary is somewhat navel gazing. Even in a democracy there will still be some who hijack the government to create industries for the Plutocracy to the legal exclusion of others.  This is not anti prosperity but an acknowledgement of certain realities.  The semi conductor industry or the internet would not have exploded without early government support.  How does the whole of society benefit from something that collective resources were used for. (note: Bill Gates Sr. advocates for Inheritance Taxation)
      On a separate topic, industries that are unfair (addictive chemicals) in the marketplace can not be sold in a true free market.  If I make you addicted, you're no longer making a choice.  Similarly, in a nation of laws we need to determine if certain activities can be regulated in courts.

      If a woman (or man) enters into a contract to engage in 10 sex acts for a car and then crashes the car and has no money to pay, is she/he going to be legally required to perform the service?  Big questions.  While in principle I agree with the fundamental principles of the Libertarian Party there are some realities that need to be addressed before the Party can be taken seriously.
      Signed,
      Life Long Libertarian.

    16. troyapeterson people always argue against Libertarianism by showing it is not perfect.  It's not.  But it is a better alternative to what he have.  -RG

    17. pandkenterprises Randy_Gage kayenta  The focus of this thread is on the morel and ethical issues we face as a society, so I don;t want it to turn into a debate on the Libertarian party.  But the basic answer is we support an army to protect the country, a police force to protect private property, and a court system to adjudicate disputes.  -RG

    18. Randy_Gage pandkenterprises kayenta I get it now - so status quo. My intent is not to get into a debate regarding Libertarian doctrine for, I too, hold the opinion that it is the best political system.  But, and I'm sure you will agree, any system is only as good as the people who run it.  The biggest problem with America isn't so much the political party that is running it as it is the apathy of its citizens.  Until people get their asses out of their La-Z-Boy chairs and diligently work for a better system, nothing will change regardless who's running the country.
      I do want to give you kudos on this post.  It is one of the best ones I have seen you write and the responses prove it.  Most of your posts are succinct without much controversy, and the responses from your followers are superficial ("Thanks, Randy"; "I love you Randy"; "You are the best thing since sliced bread"; "Will you have my baby, Randy?", etc.).  This one got people questioning their own beliefs and thinking for themselves, which is a monumental task.  Have you ever thought of running for President (after you have made baby, of course)?

    19. troyapeterson Troy, very thought-provoking post.  By the way, I have a car I am not using.  Do you know a woman who needs one (and I promise not to crash it)?

    20. Randy_Gage troyapeterson I make no arguments against it, in fact, i actively lobby for it. I agree it's the only prosperity focused game in town.  My framing is meant more to juxtapose the idealized vs. the practical political and legal realities of our current environment.  I'd argue that it's not only the best alternative to what we have but the only legitimate alternative which is why I hope the thought leaders in this space will consider these problems in their political copy. 🙂

    21. My brain is hurting and yet not hurting from reading this post. The content and topic is so poignant to studying and attracting true prosperity consciousness. Thankyou for that!
      I'd say you make a relevant point about free thinkers using that power to stay congruent and actually be true free thinkers.
      am grateful to have the right to choose not to stay in rapore with people who clearly demonstrate disregard for their own health and prosperity, and have zero desire to attract prosperity, or love those of us who do.
      ie: when my gut tells me self love isn't there, in people, they get little attention from me, if they don't indicate openness and willingness to learn
      you're right, people have the right to believe what they want, I can still pursue friendships and try to educate them; if I'm comfortable doing so.
      empathy, love and compassion don't have to be directly interactive to be effective

      a person can remain detached and live and let live, yet still empathize and have compassion..

      I've witnessed at least two instances where parents have put their childs well being in jeopardy because of their "vices" and mindlessness, it's repulsive and disgusting..

      I simply withdraw my support, usually.. cause people get peeved if you convey to them you think you "see" some harmful ways
      of them interacting with - or influencing their kids
      I'm not the "perfect man" and don't pretend to be.. far from it.. I do know what works for my well being, isn't what works for someone else.. and I can respect that..
      simply trying to be the change I want to "see" in the world.. setting a prosperous example after being not being as prosperous as I could have been in the past..
      discipline and wisdom are my two watchwords..

    22. Who should we support if there isn't a Libertarian party available?  
      With the general election coming up in the UK next month I am considering who to vote for, there isn't a libertarian party.  I realise that in the end I have more control over my own prosperity then any of the political parties but there is an influence presented by the party in power so it is worth considering

    23. I am a Christian and a Libertarian. A close reading of the Bible (New Testament) - particularly the words of Jesus - will reveal that all human rights are to be protected and honored. While I agree with much of what you say Randy, it is not true Christianity that is the problem - it is those who distort it and read their own agenda into it, while claiming to be Christians. Jesus never condemned those who practice homosexuality, and neither should any of us!

    24. This is a wonderfully thought out and written post on how and why if we want to live by certain freedoms, we need to accept that others are entitled to do the same. Too many people seem to think that while their "rights" should be protected, those who espouse beliefs that they don't believe in should not have the same rights.

    25. RoseSarko But whose Christianity do you follow?  There are over 30,000 different sects of Christianity (Catholics, Mormons, Lutherans, etc., etc.) and all of them claim to be the only true way to Heaven.  A couple things thing about religious followers, they can cherry pick and delude themselves like no other group.  The crazier the bullshit (Planet Kolob, walking on water, 72 virgins when you die, male deity that is constantly spying on you, Galactic Ruler Xenu, and on and on) the more people want to believe.  Time for human to grow-up and use some common sense.

    26. "The nun’s habit. The priest’s cassock. The Jewish prayer shawl. The Muslim’s skullcap. The saffron robes of the Buddhist monk. All are part of a rich tapestry of human devotion to God.
      Not all such religious vestments are on public display. Some are seen only in places of worship. Temple robes of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, known as the robes of the holy priesthood, are worn only inside Mormon temples and reserved for the highest sacraments of the faith. White symbolizes purity. There is no insignia or rank. The most senior apostle and the newest member are indistinguishable when dressed in the same way. Men and women wear similar clothing. The simple vestments combine religious symbolism with echoes of antiquity reflected in ancient writings from the book of Exodus.
      In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, there are no outer religious vestments in ordinary worship services.
      However, many faithful Latter-day Saints wear a garment under their clothing that has deep religious significance. Similar in design to ordinary modest underclothing, it comes in two pieces and is usually referred to as the “temple garment.”
      Some people incorrectly refer to temple garments as magical or “magic underwear.” These words are not only inaccurate but also offensive to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There is nothing magical or mystical about temple garments, and Church members ask for the same degree of respect and sensitivity that would be afforded to any other faith by people of goodwill." and Mormon garments are no different. Mormons do not believe they are "magical" like you stated. Ask you're friends who you say you have that are Mormon.

    27. Randy, I agree with every word of yours!
      what I love most was:  
      ".....And if you believe in prosperity consciousness, hope to change them with education, empathy and love".
      Amen!

    28. pandkenterprises RoseSarko Good question....not sure what it's called, so I guess it's my version - LOL!  I follow the teaching of Jesus, which are coherent with my Libertarian beliefs. Jesus preached tolerance, love, and forgiveness, and that we are all equal in the eyes of God. Unfortunately many of his teachings have been twisted around by various sects (as you mentioned). Case in point: I recently tried out a new church, which appealed to me because on their website they focused on New Testament Christianity. However, upon attending, I was disappointed that it was the same old "homosexuality is evil," and "women should not be leaders in the church because the Bible says so."  Well, Jesus never said either of these things, and in fact, he had MANY women followers, and from everything I've read, treated women as equal to men (which was very unusual for the times). I agree with a lot of Randy's teachings. But those of you on here bashing Christianity should also look at "the log in your own eye" - you are condemning others for their beliefs just the same as the Christians you are preaching against!

    29. Inalienable rights are rights that can be contracted away (legal definition).  Unalienable rights cannot be.  This is a serious and major flaw in popular writing that should be addressed.  When you promote the concept of unalienable rights while writing inalienable rights you are promoting something which the legal system uses to actually trample your unalienable rights.  I invite you to investigate the difference further.

    30. RoseSarko pandkenterprises I don't care what form of supernatural religion someone wants to believe in.  As a free country (it really isn't, but let's pretend for a moment it is), a person should be free to believe anything he/she wants and not be persecuted about their beliefs.  I believe in ALL of the 27 Amendments (although the 18th and the 21st ace each other out).  Being from Montana, I often hear about the erosion of the 2nd Amendment (the Government is hiding in the shadows waiting to kick our doors in and steal all of our guns!) but no one bitches about separation of Church and State.  Actually, most people don't want separation as long as it is Christianity that is being pushed in our schools.  Again, more cherry picking.  People need to look at religion as they do a pair of shoes - find something that fits you and you are comfortable with (some people, such as myself, feeling comfortable going barefooted), but don't try to make me wear your "shoes".

    31. TheRealMaxCasey Are you from the UK?  I think that may be the case still there.  Here in the States, inalienable evolved from unalienable over the centuries and means "not transferable to another or capable of being repudiated"  -RG

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