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Poverty is a Sin

Posted By: Randy GageNovember 18, 2020

Someone you know is a professional victim.  (Hopefully it’s not you.)  Maybe you know a few.  Professional victims have drama and trauma “happen” to them constantly.  The hurricane blows their roof off, the company they work for goes bust, they get a bad medical diagnosis, their lover cheats on them, their dog dies, and a meteorite lands on their pool deck.  Then, next week, the dynamic repeats all over again. (I know all this because I was a professional victim for the first 30 years of my life.)  Professional victims talk a lot about fate and luck, and very little about personal responsibility. 

Believe it or not, the main cause of all these catastrophes is the philosophy they live by in the spirituality arena.  Because while there are random acts, there are no random lives. You will manifest prosperity or poverty to the degree you believe you’re worthy of it. All of which leads us into part five of our series on the key philosophies that determine your worldview…

And the results that worldview produces for you.  In this case, we’re exploring the philosophy you develop about god, religion, and your spiritual nature.  In case you’re just jumping in, here’s the premise we’re operating on:

There are seven major, life-defining philosophies you develop about prosperity – these seven philosophies determine your worldview – and this resulting worldview regulates the level of prosperity you will experience.   

Every day you’re making decisions that affect your prosperity.  Unfortunately, you’re not making most of these decisions mindfully.  Because what you decide on these situational decisions has already been predetermined by the philosophies you developed for living, in the seven core areas. 

For those of you keeping score at home, the seven areas of life-determining philosophies are:

  1. Health (Part 1)
  2. Relationships (Part 2)
  3. Environment (Part 3)
  4. Leverage (Part 4)
  5. Spirituality
  6. Financial
  7. Purpose

If you’re wondering why I equate the victimhood behavior described above with someone’s belief system about spirituality, here’s why: People in victimhood blame their situation in life on fate or destiny, the same way many religious people believe their fate is determined or predetermined by an omnipresent, omniscient, omnipotent force. 

I get asked frequently why I’m so hard on organized religion.  Most who ask the question believe I’m on a crusade to convert the world to atheism.  In actuality, that’s the last thing I want to do.  There are many people whose faith nourishes their lives and souls in wondrous ways, and that’s a beautiful thing to behold. If you believe in an all-powerful force and your faith offers principles and guidelines for living that you find helpful, consider yourself blessed. 

But if you need a holy book, doctrines, or dogma to know right from wrong and good from evil, then I posit that you’ve given away your aspirational power for self-determination.  By doing so, you also give away your power to manifest a prosperous life.  This is the intersection where the philosophy you have about spirituality factors into your daily decisions and determines the level of prosperity you will experience.  More specifically, the level of prosperity you will allow yourself to experience.

There are two beliefs organized religion propagates that I consider to be destructive and dangerous to you.  If you have allowed yourself to be programmed by them, you’ve pretty much assured yourself a life of lack and limitation.  The two beliefs are:

  1. You are not worthy to be healthy, happy, and prosperous.
  2. Your real life hasn’t begun yet, and if you patiently slog your way through the warm-up, you’ll be rewarded with happiness in your afterlife. 

There are millions of people unconsciously rushing through what they believe is a prologue to their life but is actually a prologue to their death.

And that is a sin. 

You don’t necessarily need to renounce your faith or become an atheist to manifest a prosperous life.  (Although you might.)  But you do need to renounce any beliefs such as:

  • You are just here to pay penance for a past life.
  • You’re not worthy.
  • It’s spiritual to be poor.
  • This is just a dress rehearsal and happiness will come in the afterlife.
  • You require redemption or salvation.
  • A god has predetermined your destiny.
  • You won’t reach happiness or enlightenment until a future reincarnation.

Whether or not you believe in a supernatural entity isn't really the point.  The real factor is whether you believe life happens to you, or you believe you are a co-creator in what happens in and around you.  Co-creators have pride of ownership in their lives and they take personal responsibility for them.  And only then can you manifest true prosperity.  Next post, we’ll explore the sixth area: your financial philosophy.  Until then, would love to see your comments below.

Peace,

- RG

9 comments on “Poverty is a Sin”

  1. poverty is not sin because it is not something you can do. it is not an action, it is not a decision, it is a state, a temporary condition.

    for such a statement to make sense, it would be the actions or decisions that lead to poverty that could be considered sin. but then again some of those actions or decisions are clearly not sinful. for instance, refusing a job that would require one to miss the mark in one way or another, in a context wherein one won't have an income to rely on for the foreseeable future. so not all actions or decisions that lead to poverty are necessarily sinful, quite the contrary. the idea of a test of faith is not based on fiction. it is something that can actually be experienced for real.

    so, ultimately, it is rather the belief that poverty must be avoided, at all costs and at all times, that leads to error. in other words, there are moments when choosing poverty is the right way forward, the decision that doesn't miss the mark. for instance, when an opportunity to receive an income would require one to commit a crime, or give up on one's dream.

    as discussed in response to another of your posts, poverty has its function. for some individuals, it is part of the right trajectory, a necessary passage for them to learn a lesson or atone for a past misunderstanding.

    also, your idea of the "two destructive beliefs" alledgedly propagated by organized religion clearly show a superficial understanding of those matters.

    1. Your answer is a nonsense.

      You assume that one must commit crimes to be rich. This is called a "limiting belief", which says that you have no other means to be rich other than to commit crimes (next thing to consider is that many things aren't crimes just because the government said so (refusing to pay taxes, for instance (and I know you going to take it wrong))).

      There is no way to help other other than to produce something useful to them, for which you gain money. They make them rich, they make you rich. You just cannot say that those who producing cars are better off than all the people who using cars combined.

      It is hilarious to think that poverty has ANY upsides. It doesn't. It is downright evil, just like those advocating it.

    2. You're saying that poverty isn't a sin because it is neither a behavior or decision. I posit that prosperity is not money and material things, but a state of consciousness. And likewise, poverty is not an absence of money and material things, but a state of consciousness.

  2. Sir Gage, I quote Findicus 2, Chapter 3, Verse 1: "Ye shall inherit the adulation of the playful and the leftovers of the unwatchful," whatever the fuck that means.

    Preach, Randy, preach! Continue to confound befuddled minds! Thanks for modeling clarity in a foggy world.

  3. Wow! Lifelong Catholic here; attended twelve years of Catholic school.
    At no time has the Church taught me that anyone isn't worthy of a happy life, including wellbeing physically or financially, or that this life somehow doesn't 'count '
    WHAT MISGUIDED NONSENSE HAVE YOU BEEN EXPOSED TO?
    The vast majority of my many former CATHOLIC classmates own nice homes and cars, have nice families, aren't suffering through their lives awaiting happiness.

    Where did you get that nonsense from?

    We are taught that this life is a gift from God and we are to develop our talents and shine in the world.

    BIBLE QUOTE: 3 John 1:2
    ...that you may prosper in all things and be in health, just as your soul prospers.

    1. AS I said in the essay, If you believe in an all-powerful force and your faith offers principles and guidelines for living that you find helpful, consider yourself blessed.

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  • 9 comments on “Poverty is a Sin”

    1. poverty is not sin because it is not something you can do. it is not an action, it is not a decision, it is a state, a temporary condition.

      for such a statement to make sense, it would be the actions or decisions that lead to poverty that could be considered sin. but then again some of those actions or decisions are clearly not sinful. for instance, refusing a job that would require one to miss the mark in one way or another, in a context wherein one won't have an income to rely on for the foreseeable future. so not all actions or decisions that lead to poverty are necessarily sinful, quite the contrary. the idea of a test of faith is not based on fiction. it is something that can actually be experienced for real.

      so, ultimately, it is rather the belief that poverty must be avoided, at all costs and at all times, that leads to error. in other words, there are moments when choosing poverty is the right way forward, the decision that doesn't miss the mark. for instance, when an opportunity to receive an income would require one to commit a crime, or give up on one's dream.

      as discussed in response to another of your posts, poverty has its function. for some individuals, it is part of the right trajectory, a necessary passage for them to learn a lesson or atone for a past misunderstanding.

      also, your idea of the "two destructive beliefs" alledgedly propagated by organized religion clearly show a superficial understanding of those matters.

      1. Your answer is a nonsense.

        You assume that one must commit crimes to be rich. This is called a "limiting belief", which says that you have no other means to be rich other than to commit crimes (next thing to consider is that many things aren't crimes just because the government said so (refusing to pay taxes, for instance (and I know you going to take it wrong))).

        There is no way to help other other than to produce something useful to them, for which you gain money. They make them rich, they make you rich. You just cannot say that those who producing cars are better off than all the people who using cars combined.

        It is hilarious to think that poverty has ANY upsides. It doesn't. It is downright evil, just like those advocating it.

      2. You're saying that poverty isn't a sin because it is neither a behavior or decision. I posit that prosperity is not money and material things, but a state of consciousness. And likewise, poverty is not an absence of money and material things, but a state of consciousness.

    2. Sir Gage, I quote Findicus 2, Chapter 3, Verse 1: "Ye shall inherit the adulation of the playful and the leftovers of the unwatchful," whatever the fuck that means.

      Preach, Randy, preach! Continue to confound befuddled minds! Thanks for modeling clarity in a foggy world.

    3. Wow! Lifelong Catholic here; attended twelve years of Catholic school.
      At no time has the Church taught me that anyone isn't worthy of a happy life, including wellbeing physically or financially, or that this life somehow doesn't 'count '
      WHAT MISGUIDED NONSENSE HAVE YOU BEEN EXPOSED TO?
      The vast majority of my many former CATHOLIC classmates own nice homes and cars, have nice families, aren't suffering through their lives awaiting happiness.

      Where did you get that nonsense from?

      We are taught that this life is a gift from God and we are to develop our talents and shine in the world.

      BIBLE QUOTE: 3 John 1:2
      ...that you may prosper in all things and be in health, just as your soul prospers.

      1. AS I said in the essay, If you believe in an all-powerful force and your faith offers principles and guidelines for living that you find helpful, consider yourself blessed.

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